Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Tips on accelerating the shelf life testing of mushroom based product


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Focal food

Focal food

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 10 posts
  • 2 thanks
0
Neutral

  • South Africa
    South Africa
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa

Posted 13 May 2008 - 10:17 AM

Hi,
I have a mushroom based product that I am working on at the moment. The product is completely free of any artificials at present, but the client wants a longer shelf life- currently only about two weeks.

I have pasteurised the product at 85 C for 10 minutes. And am now waiting to see what happens. Does anybody have information on accelerating the shelf life testing? I have 6 weeks to test the product for a year long shelf life- I know that there are ways and means but no idea where to start looking.

Thanks,
Regards,
Norah


  • 0
Norah Hayes
Focal Food
www.focalfood.co.za

#2 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 11,390 posts
  • 1018 thanks
222
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Running, Cycling, Manager of a Football Team, Work, Watching Sport, The Internet, Food, Real Ale and Sleeping...

Posted 13 May 2008 - 08:04 PM

Hi,
I have a mushroom based product that I am working on at the moment. The product is completely free of any artificials at present, but the client wants a longer shelf life- currently only about two weeks.

I have pasteurised the product at 85 C for 10 minutes. And am now waiting to see what happens. Does anybody have information on accelerating the shelf life testing? I have 6 weeks to test the product for a year long shelf life- I know that there are ways and means but no idea where to start looking.

Thanks,
Regards,
Norah

Anyone got experience in this area to share with Norah.
  • 0

Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


1. No spam, profanity, pornography, trolling or personal attacks

2. Topics and posts should be “on topic” and related to site content
3. No (unpaid) advertising
4. You may have one account on the board at any one time
5. Enjoy your stay!


#3 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 2,216 posts
  • 468 thanks
55
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 14 May 2008 - 04:01 PM

I do have experience but only early on in my career with confectionery. It depended on the confectionery product and the type of expected degredation; e.g. for a biscuit based product, a warm, wet atmosphere was used to accelarate softening. The problem is, this was a method developed over years with no basis in the literature as far as I'm aware and also only quality degredation was expected not pathogen growth. They also had the years of practical experience of their products in the marketplace.

I suppose I will start with pathogens - are any likely? Is growth likely? Do you have Aw measurements? Once you know that you're looking for quality degredation only, it will be easier to work with but this might be methodology you develop over time unfortunately.


  • 0

#4 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 12,449 posts
  • 3244 thanks
347
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 14 May 2008 - 06:07 PM

Dear Norah,

No direct experience but some general theory with practical examples is given in a book "quality of frozen food" whose relevant pages are freely viewable on the web (google "microbiological accelerated shelf life testing" and look for title / authors Marilyn Erickson and Yen-con Hung on 1st google page). This does not discuss microbiological data (I think). The reasons are discussed in these other relevant links, seems micro.testing is considered to have limited use unless a lot of product detail is available. Nonetheless I know it is done from my own experience in seafood.
Sorry but didn't see any specific answers for mushrooms.

http://www.foodscien.../shelf-life.htm
http://www.rhmtech.c...e/microbial.php
http://www.foodprodu...462_0298QA.html
http://www.foodscien...fsn/2/fsn2d.htm
http://www.meatupdat...UPDATE_06-2.pdf

Rgds / Charles.C


  • 0

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 AS NUR

AS NUR

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 581 posts
  • 52 thanks
8
Neutral

  • Indonesia
    Indonesia
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:east java, indonesia

Posted 16 May 2008 - 09:00 AM

Hi,
I have a mushroom based product that I am working on at the moment. The product is completely free of any artificials at present, but the client wants a longer shelf life- currently only about two weeks.

I have pasteurised the product at 85 C for 10 minutes. And am now waiting to see what happens. Does anybody have information on accelerating the shelf life testing? I have 6 weeks to test the product for a year long shelf life- I know that there are ways and means but no idea where to start looking.

Thanks,
Regards,
Norah



DEar Norah...

to make a study for shelf life test using accelerating methode.. :
1. you have to define what the critical parameter for the mushroom quality changes.. i think the parameters are : changes in colour, mass loss, and microbial spoilage

2. Using diferent temperature for accelerating test plus one Temperature control..you can use T control + 10oC and Tcontrol + 20oC, for example if your control temperature is 25oC, the tempertaure test are 25, 35,45 and 55 oC.

3. And after that you can count the self life using Arhenius formula..

hope can help you
  • 0

#6 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 11,390 posts
  • 1018 thanks
222
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Running, Cycling, Manager of a Football Team, Work, Watching Sport, The Internet, Food, Real Ale and Sleeping...

Posted 20 May 2008 - 08:42 PM

Norah - have the replies answered your query?


  • 0

Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


1. No spam, profanity, pornography, trolling or personal attacks

2. Topics and posts should be “on topic” and related to site content
3. No (unpaid) advertising
4. You may have one account on the board at any one time
5. Enjoy your stay!


#7 okido

okido

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 205 posts
  • 11 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Netherlands
    Netherlands
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 May 2008 - 04:12 PM

Hi Norah,

Only little experience with meat and cheese.
Increasing the temperature to 35-45 C.
We compared the cooled products with the hot stored ones on discoloration only.

Have a nice day, Okido


  • 0

#8 Focal food

Focal food

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 10 posts
  • 2 thanks
0
Neutral

  • South Africa
    South Africa
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa

Posted 26 May 2008 - 06:19 AM

Hi All,
Thanks a million for all your responses. I am busy looking through all the information, but am sure this will give me a better idea.

Kind regards,
Norah- Ann


  • 0
Norah Hayes
Focal Food
www.focalfood.co.za




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users