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E. coli O157:H7 - How Tough are You?


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Poll: E. coli O157:H7 - How Tough are You? (13 member(s) have cast votes)

Compared to all other bacteria, viruses and other vomit inducing bugs

  1. Tyson – pound for pound the scariest bacteria in town (7 votes [53.85%])

    Percentage of vote: 53.85%

  2. Heavy weight – I wouldn’t want to meet him on a dark night (3 votes [23.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.08%

  3. Middle weight – Hmmm…to fight or to flight (3 votes [23.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.08%

  4. Light weight – You talking to me? (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#1 Simon

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 03:11 PM

Next under the microscope in our “How Tough are You” series we are taking a look at the ever popular E. coli O157:H7.

With regard to E. coli O157:H7:

- What does it look like?
- What foods can it be found on and in?
- Where does it come from?
- What illness or physical symptoms can it cause in humans?
- How do we prevent, control and eradicate it?
- Has it ever caused you or someone you know harm?
- What is its toughness rating – please vote!


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#2 Tony-C

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 03:52 AM

E. coli O157:H7:

What does it look like?
E. coli O157:H7 is a gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium. The letter "O" in the name refers to the somatic antigen number. The "H" refers to the flagella antigen.

What foods can it be found on and in?
Ground beef, unprocessed milk and juices, raw vegetables and salads.

Where does it come from?
Contact with infected live animals. Animal faeces. Swimming in contaminated lakes, pools, or drinking inadequately treated water.
E.coli O157:H7 can live in the intestines of healthy cattle.
The toxin requires highly specific receptors on the cells' surface in order to attach and enter the cell; species such as cattle, swine, and deer which do not carry these receptors may harbour toxigenic bacteria without any ill effect and shedding them in their faeces.
Meat can become contaminated during slaughter and can be mixed into beef when it is ground into hamburger.
Bacteria present on the cow's udders or on equipment may get into raw milk.
Most types of food can be cross-contaminated by poor hygiene procedures.
Flies can transmit E.coli O157.

What illness or physical symptoms can it cause in humans?
E. coli O157:H7 infection often causes severe, acute bloody diarrhoea and abdominal cramps. Usually little or no fever is present, and the illness resolves in 5 to 10 days. It can also be asymptomatic. In some people, particularly children under 5 years of age and the elderly, the infection can cause haemolytic uremic syndrome, in which the red blood cells are destroyed and the kidneys fail. About 5% of infections lead to this complication, 2% are fatal. Most cases of haemolytic uremic syndrome are caused by E. coli O157:H7.

How do we prevent, control and eradicate it?
Proper cooking and good hygienic procedures.
Avoid contaminated water and wash hands after contact with animals
Thorough washing in the preparation of salads and raw vegetables.
Avoiding unprocessed milks and juices from dubious sources.

Has it ever caused you or someone you know harm?
Fortunately not

What is its toughness rating?
Tyson - Only needs low numbers of bacteria to kill off an opponent

Regards,

Tony

#3 Simon

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 02:12 PM

Tony, thanks to your post I know a lot more about E.coli O157 now...and it sounds pretty nasty. I don't think I've had it.


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#4 Tony-C

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 03:34 PM

Kind of puts you off minced beef though doesn't it! :bug:

Regards,

Tony



#5 Jean

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 05:56 AM

I would never take any chances..


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J

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#6 a_andhika

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 05:22 AM

Hmmm, although I dont want being infected by it, but I guess I'll drop my vote on Heavy Weight rating. Coz IMO, Salmonella is still the hottest bacteria in town...

One of the scariest thing about E. coli O157:H7 is, they are producing toxins in human's gut, not in the food! :yikes:

I have a literature from NZFSA (again), bout the mentioned E. coli. This might add some information besides the comprehend explanation from Tony-C.

Regards,


Arya

Attached Files


IF
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AND
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THEN
why should I bother?

#7 Abdul Qudoos

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 06:49 AM

Please have a look on attachment: to know about E. coli O157:H7

Attached Files


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#8 sudarshan

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 10:30 AM

Hi all

See attachement about E. coli O157:H7 effect.

Attached Files


Best Regards
Sudarshan Koli
koli.sudarshan@gmail.com




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