Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Air Curtains - Data-Based Criteria For Effectiveness?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Jon5

Jon5

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 44 posts
  • 4 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California
  • Interests:Professional:
    Food safety, food defense, auditing, HACCP.

    Personal:
    Hiking, gardening, home improvement, and spending time with loved ones.

Posted 23 June 2010 - 09:19 PM

All:

I'm hoping some of you may be able to send me in the right direction on this one. We've had some discussion lately about the effectiveness of air curtains, and I'm wondering whether there is any research available to demonstrate what air velocity is needed for them to be effective at preventing pest ingress. Is there a way to do an operational check to verify their effectiveness (i.e. using an anemometer or similar device)?

For those of you who are Monty Python fans, I don't think knowing the air velocity of a swallow will help me out on this one. :-)

Thanks in advance for any help...

Jon



#2 tsmith7858

tsmith7858

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 262 posts
  • 51 thanks
10
Good

  • United States
    United States

Posted 24 June 2010 - 04:30 PM

For those of you who are Monty Python fans, I don't think knowing the air velocity of a swallow will help me out on this one. :-)




"Well, you have to know these things when you're a king, you know!" Posted Image

Sorry, I couldn't resist. Unforntunately I can't help you with your question.

#3 Simon

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,287 posts
  • 1293 thanks
590
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 01 July 2010 - 09:19 PM

I can't help you either Jon.


hand-pointing-down.gif
 
Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 140 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

recommend-us-on-facebook.png


#4 rosem

rosem

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 17 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Turkey
    Turkey
  • Gender:Female

Posted 04 July 2010 - 12:45 PM

All:

I'm hoping some of you may be able to send me in the right direction on this one. We've had some discussion lately about the effectiveness of air curtains, and I'm wondering whether there is any research available to demonstrate what air velocity is needed for them to be effective at preventing pest ingress. Is there a way to do an operational check to verify their effectiveness (i.e. using an anemometer or similar device)?

For those of you who are Monty Python fans, I don't think knowing the air velocity of a swallow will help me out on this one. :-)

Thanks in advance for any help...

Jon




Hi;

i dont know anything for measure velocity (just anemometer) but

for air curtains;

Door height &width also engine power is important for prevent from pest.

max. door height should be 6 m. According to the wideness you have to add more air curtains.

13m/s velocity can be protected your facility.

#5 Jon5

Jon5

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 44 posts
  • 4 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California
  • Interests:Professional:
    Food safety, food defense, auditing, HACCP.

    Personal:
    Hiking, gardening, home improvement, and spending time with loved ones.

Posted 06 July 2010 - 06:28 PM

Simon -

Nice! Thanks for that. :-)

I can't help you either Jon.

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2R3FvS4xr4"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=y2R3FvS4xr4[/url]



#6 Ptinid

Ptinid

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 40 posts
  • 10 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Interests:Pest Management, Angling, Blues. Not necessarily in that order!

Posted 28 September 2010 - 03:51 PM

Hi Jon

I'm afraid that the answer to your question is that your question is a bit too vague. What pests are you talking about? Flies will be kept out relatively easily if they are relatively small, but I've seen wasps and birds both walk in through an air curtain. They certainly will not stop rodents, although they may have a deterrent effect.

Your assessment should be based upon a specific set of risks and the questions asked of those situations.

One simplistic method of checking effectiveness on flying insect would be by doing on/off comparison counts in a fly killer situated inside the doorway. It does give quite gross numbers, but if there is a signficant difference in species count, that could be seen as proof of effectiveness. I can't find any published data on any direct empirical work, sorry.



#7 Jon5

Jon5

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 44 posts
  • 4 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California
  • Interests:Professional:
    Food safety, food defense, auditing, HACCP.

    Personal:
    Hiking, gardening, home improvement, and spending time with loved ones.

Posted 04 October 2010 - 04:15 PM

Thank you for your feedback.

I think pest control can be looked at in the same way as any other food safety issue; that is, in a HACCP-based system, hazards must be eliminated OR reduced to an acceptable level. Pest control is a PRP, not a CCP, but I think the philosophy still fits. Very few if any pests can be controlled absolutely, I think, but if we can keep the great majority of them out of the building we're in good shape. Clean rooms, of course, are a different story. There should rarely, if ever, be any pests of any sort in a clean room. That's my opinion, and of course depends on the sort of operation.

Hi Jon

I'm afraid that the answer to your question is that your question is a bit too vague. What pests are you talking about? Flies will be kept out relatively easily if they are relatively small, but I've seen wasps and birds both walk in through an air curtain. They certainly will not stop rodents, although they may have a deterrent effect.

Your assessment should be based upon a specific set of risks and the questions asked of those situations.

One simplistic method of checking effectiveness on flying insect would be by doing on/off comparison counts in a fly killer situated inside the doorway. It does give quite gross numbers, but if there is a signficant difference in species count, that could be seen as proof of effectiveness. I can't find any published data on any direct empirical work, sorry.



#8 Ptinid

Ptinid

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 40 posts
  • 10 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Interests:Pest Management, Angling, Blues. Not necessarily in that order!

Posted 27 October 2010 - 08:06 PM

I agree with you Jon, but you did ask a specific question about effectiveness. :)



#9 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,376 posts
  • 4836 thanks
943
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 28 October 2010 - 05:31 AM

Dear jon5,

For starters, thanks to google -

http://www.jsaircurt...96-application/

http://www.globalind...al-air-curtains

Despite the above, my personal experience (for small-medium flies) has not been too good within a wet product input environment > rapid rusting. Giant size, internally mounted, out-blowing fan (near hat-lifting velocity!) + multiple electrocuters was ultimately less hassle.

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate