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Level three Hazard Analysis


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#1 h@select

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:31 PM

I am confused about the Physical, Chemical and Biological hazards for the food quality plan for level three. Does anyone have any suggestions? I keep getting confused with the hazards from the food safety plan. Let me know if anyone can help. Thank you!



#2 esquef

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 02:19 PM

I am confused about the Physical, Chemical and Biological hazards for the food quality plan for level three. Does anyone have any suggestions? I keep getting confused with the hazards from the food safety plan. Let me know if anyone can help. Thank you!



Well, take this for what it's worth since my company is Level 2 certified, but I'd have to think that in general physical, chemical, and biological hazards would be food safety related, not food quality related.

#3 Charles.C

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 04:21 PM

Dear h@select,

I am not a user myself but I presume you are referring to this chunk of the guidance document -

This preparation of a Food Quality Plan is required to control quality. At this level the Supplier is required to undertake a risk assessment of the process to determine those points that are critical to ensuring food quality using the guiding principles of the HACCP method. You are required to demonstrate that the Food Quality Plan provides the desired outcome and that the analysis is validated and verified by an SQF Practitioner.
As in HACCP, the entire process is to be reviewed at each step from receiving raw materials to distribution.
The risk analysis determines which point(s) in the process are critical to the quality of the product. Those points are designated as a “Critical Quality Point (CQP)”. Each CQP must have its critical limit(s) defined, monitoring tasks identified (who, what, how, how often). Corrective actions must be defined; verification and validation steps identified, and records maintained. Tasks associated with the food quality plan should be documented as work instructions or SOPs and appropriate staff must be trained.

Some examples of CQP in general processing could be product weight, product count, size, color, moisture, titratable acidity, defects, viscosity, process temperature, head space, dwell time, batter pick-up, drain weight, free fatty acid concentration, receiving temperature, percentage of salt, pH, raw material inspection, cook temperature, storage temperature, packaging integrity, coding, etc.

Guidelines outlining the application of HACCP when preparing the Level 3 Food Quality Plan are outlined in 9.0
The SQF Practitioner is required to maintain, validate and verify the Food Quality Plan.
Further requirements regarding the verification and validation activities are set forth in section 4.5.


Logically the analysis/results will relate to yr product / process ?

You might find this commercial standard which also extends the purely safety analysis to also include quality aspects interesting, eg see their definition of hazard. Personally I find this enlarged concept distinctly unlikeable but it was quite common in the early days of haccp.

Attached File  woolworths standard.pdf   569.66KB   393 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 h@select

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 04:58 PM

I guess I just get confused about the difference of hazards having to do with the food safety and quality plans. It seems like I keep going back to safety hazards that are already in my food safety plan but am having a hard time creating the food quality plan with different "Quality" hazards.




Dear h@select,

I am not a user myself but I presume you are referring to this chunk of the guidance document -



Logically the analysis/results will relate to yr product / process ?

You might find this commercial standard which also extends the purely safety analysis to also include quality aspects interesting, eg see their definition of hazard. Personally I find this enlarged concept distinctly unlikeable but it was quite common in the early days of haccp.

Attached File  woolworths standard.pdf   569.66KB   393 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C



#5 Mr. Incognito

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:58 PM

I guess I just get confused about the difference of hazards having to do with the food safety and quality plans. It seems like I keep going back to safety hazards that are already in my food safety plan but am having a hard time creating the food quality plan with different "Quality" hazards.


This is a pretty old thread not sure if you ever found the answer you were looking for:

Some issues may affect quality and not safety such as in the Yogurt industry if you find that when you run a greek seperator in a certain way you may get graininess. That quality defect is not going to kill anyone but there will be little bits of grain in the product that does not belong there. So that might be one that would be Quality but not Safety.

In the pasta industry if your dough mix has 1% more regrind than it's supposed to that could create quality defects that might have a quality effect on your product that will not cause a food safety issue.

Some aspects of Yogurt will be both. If the product is not refrigerated properly then there will be quality and food safety issues.

Some issues could cause a food safety issue but not necessarily affect the quality. In pasta you should have a piece of metal. That piece of metal isn't going to necessarily make the pasta bad but if you eat it you can get hurt from it.

So you see depending on your industry/product there are different things that can come up.

Make two lists. One for what can affect product safety and one for what can affect product quality (lower shelf life, messed up taste, etc) then make your hazard analysis based off of those hazards.

Hope that makes sense.

Merle
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