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#1 MFSC

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 03:32 PM

I am looking for some guidelines for monitoring yeast and mould in the environment. This is a fresh produce packing facility with climate controlled coolers.

Will begin testing using air plates exposed for 15 minutes. But what are considered good guidelines/numbers?



Can anyone send me some good references.



#2 Oldairyman

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:09 PM

I am looking for some guidelines for monitoring yeast and mould in the environment. This is a fresh produce packing facility with climate controlled coolers.

Will begin testing using air plates exposed for 15 minutes. But what are considered good guidelines/numbers?



Can anyone send me some good references.

Yes a good medium would be DG-18 plates. The is for xerophilic fungi, most common food spoilage mould. Most testing is done with one hour exposure. This gives you a better air spore deposite. It also gives you real time exposure, traffic in and out, door opening, fans, coolers, vents.... . A reasonable colony count after 5 day incubation at room temp, in the dark, would be 15 colonies . This also depends on outside influence , weather dry periods, operate near a wood mill, garbage recycling plant..... You need to establish your own limits, and how to improve your air quality. Control of fungal spores helps with 3 to 4 micron filters, UV lights, lots of air movement, low moisture environment, and the best enviromental sanitizers would be Iodine type, or Chorine based. Others work but not a deadly on fungus. A good read is "Introduction to food and Airbourn Fungi by Robert Samson of the Netherlands, or Ailsa Hocking and Jon Pit authorities in Australia.
Part of the International Commision on Food Mycology
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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:55 PM

Yes a good medium would be DG-18 plates. The is for xerophilic fungi, most common food spoilage mould. Most testing is done with one hour exposure. This gives you a better air spore deposite. It also gives you real time exposure, traffic in and out, door opening, fans, coolers, vents.... . A reasonable colony count after 5 day incubation at room temp, in the dark, would be 15 colonies . This also depends on outside influence , weather dry periods, operate near a wood mill, garbage recycling plant..... You need to establish your own limits, and how to improve your air quality. Control of fungal spores helps with 3 to 4 micron filters, UV lights, lots of air movement, low moisture environment, and the best enviromental sanitizers would be Iodine type, or Chorine based. Others work but not a deadly on fungus. A good read is "Introduction to food and Airbourn Fungi by Robert Samson of the Netherlands, or Ailsa Hocking and Jon Pit authorities in Australia.
Part of the International Commision on Food Mycology
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Dear Oldairyman,

Amazingly interesting. :clap:

I daresay there are some IT references existing also but yeasts and moulds always seems to be yet another micro. topic of significant subjectivity. :smile:

Thks for the input.

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 Oldairyman

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 12:48 AM

A good resourse would be Dr Keith Seifert University of Ottawa , Canada , part of the international Commission on Food Mycology

I am looking for some guidelines for monitoring yeast and mould in the environment. This is a fresh produce packing facility with climate controlled coolers.

Will begin testing using air plates exposed for 15 minutes. But what are considered good guidelines/numbers?



Can anyone send me some good references.



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