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How do you dry clean your sheeting conveyor belts?


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#1 Pizza&Sandwich

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 07:12 PM

For those of you that work in dry environments, how do you clean your sheeting conveyor belts? Are they fabric?

 

We have used a vacuum with a brush attachment thus far, but I don't think it's a great idea to use bristles that may fall out. What other options are there?



#2 Brian Silva

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 11:14 PM

You can conduct a hazard analysis on your belts if you find necessary.

We produce corrugated boxes which that run on both steel rollers and plastic conveyors. I would consider your conveyor belts a no risk item. We do not include them in our risk assessment and the auditor has never brought them up.

The only issue would be is if someone contaminates your belts by dropping a liquid of some kind but you should be able to see contaminants on your products and your employees should be trained to stop production and alert a superior.

Hope this helps.



#3 Pizza&Sandwich

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 01:50 PM

I should specify: dry environment = dough production

#4 flourpetal

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:38 PM

It would depend on what touches the conveyor belts.   We also use vacuum cleaners to clean a dry environment.   All of ours also do not come in contact with food.   If your food touches the conveyor belts, I would check into food grade sanitizing spray.



#5 mgourley

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:56 PM

If they are fabric belts, I would not suggest a liquid sanitizing spray.

a) you are wetting a fabric belt

b) you are sanitizing a surface that is not "clean"

 

This really all depends on your process. I have fabric belts and really do not do anything to clean them. The baking process is considered a kill step. Is this the best solution? Probably not, but outside of changing all belts to a material that can be wet cleaned and sanitized, you don't have too many options.

 

And even with that, you open yourself to many other issues that go with wet cleaning. 

 

Marshall



#6 mewwha

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 12:13 PM

Use compressed air






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