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Allergen Tolerable Limits for Dairy, Mustard and Soy?


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Bonte QA

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 07:55 PM

I have looked everywhere for tolerable limits for allergens.  We all know sulphites less than 10 ppm and gluten less than 20 ppm...

In particular i am looking for tolerable limits for dairy, mustard and soy...Does anyone have any "exact" numbers for this?

I am trying to write the validation program and intrepretation of results is difficult when values to compare to are not available.



Charles.C

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 08:47 PM

Dear Bonte QA,

 

I'm not in Canada but i discovered from a previous query that the requirements are immersed in a maze of documentation which is also chronologically confusing. It may relate to how the items occur within yr product also.

 

Can try this post/surrounding discussion for a fraction of yr query. Maybe will enlighten the remaining balance in the process.

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...cts/#entry60998

 

Regardless, other Canadian experts are welcome to contribute pro or con.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Charles.C

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 05:40 AM

Dear Bonte,

 

(addendum to previous post)

 

I omitted to mention that the result of yr quest will probably be:-  tolerable limit = not detected (ie <  current detection capability).

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


moskito

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 09:09 PM

Dear Bonte,

 

because allergenic reactions are dose-dependent and people have different sensitivities you will always find persons reacting towards very low levels of protein. Therefor anybody has to make the decision how many percent of consumers has to be protected - not easy for politicians.

But to get a good idea baout risk assessment in this area look to the australian Vital 2.0 - the best tool available in my opinion. But not legally binding.

You have to focus on the dose applied. The concentration is not the number of interest, it is the absolute amount of allergen applied per serving.

 

Rgds

moskito



Charles.C

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 12:00 AM

Dear moskito,

 

Useful comments but for Vital, the problem seems to be that most countries are not yet convinced.

 

Probablilities are strangely (?) difficult to propose where a near-instantaneous, life-threatening event is possible for someone outside the confidence interval. Even if it's only, say, 1%, or 5%?

 

Zero tolerance is such an attractive labelling decision. Just like "may contain". ;)

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Simao Monteiro

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 11:00 AM

Dear Bonte,

 

I think the labelling "without milk" may be considered "additional information" and naturally will be able to do it. However this will have to match the real composition of the product, not to mislead the consumer. For example, you should check if you really don't even have milk product (we have to think of the milk that will be embedded in other raw material) or if you don't have milk added.

You may consult this Finnish site:

www.evira.fiportalenfoodmanufactureandsalesfoodstuffsforparticularnutritionaluselow-lactoseandlactose-freefoods

 

Rgds

k



Charles.C

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 01:09 PM

Dear Bonte,

 

I think the labelling "without milk" may be considered "additional information" and naturally will be able to do it. However this will have to match the real composition of the product, not to mislead the consumer. For example, you should check if you really don't even have milk product (we have to think of the milk that will be embedded in other raw material) or if you don't have milk added.

You may consult this Finnish site:

www.evira.fiportalenfoodmanufactureandsalesfoodstuffsforparticularnutritionaluselow-lactoseandlactose-freefoods

 

Rgds

k

Dear kamandru,

 

Sorry but i didn't quite understand above post . What does "without milk" actually mean?

 

The above link for me/FFox seems to be broken.?

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Simao Monteiro

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 01:28 PM

I meant "milk free".



Simao Monteiro

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 01:30 PM



Charles.C

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 07:27 AM

Dear kamandru,

 

Thanks for the new link. Interesting site.

 

I note the (Nordic) definition of "lactose free" in the context of intolerance potential.

 

But could not see any site recommendation regarding the quantification of  "milk free" from an allergenic POV ? Presumably related to LOD / LOQ factors.

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS - the degree of consumer confusion which currently exists over this subject is illustrated in this UK/FSA link -

 

http://www.food.gov....ms#.U0-CpXJn1kg

 

(the downloadable attachment in link elaborates at considerable length on the confusion between the terminologies dairy / milk. this difficulty is well-known and has been discussed on this forum before. Interpretations seem to differ regarding the use of "free".)


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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