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What kind of risk is there having box fans in a production room?


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mruth84

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 05:23 PM

First, I thoroughly enjoy reading all the topics within the forums.  There is a wealth of information out here.  Being relatively new to the SQF scene, this has helped tremendously.

 

We manufacture dressings and sauces in a relatively controlled environment.  The production room still rises well above 90F during the summer months.  My question is, what kind of risk is there by having large box fans moving the air within the room.  The air would not be pulled into the room from another area, just getting the air moving in the area to provide some sort of relief for the production operators.

 

I appreciate any and all help. 



ChocolatesMyGame

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 05:47 PM

We use box fans in our production area as well. While we are not yet SQF certified, we have never had an issue with the FDA regarding this.  We do have them on our MSS and pre-op inspections though because they can build up dust and debris, and this seems to satisfy the auditors.



Setanta

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 06:04 PM

Seconding the importance of them being on a cleaning schedule, I would be concerned if they were on the floor, that they could move debris up where it might land on/in your product. Perhaps a fan on a floor stand would be better?

 

WeepingAngela.gif


Edited by Setanta, 20 June 2014 - 06:09 PM.

-Setanta         

 

 

 


Snookie

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 07:23 PM

You would want to monitor the air flow to make sure that you are not impacting the product.  You might want to check air pre fans and after fans to make sure your not getting higher particle or micro counts. 


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AMHunt

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 04:30 PM

We use tall fans in some production areas, as floor fans can pull dirt and debris up into the air. We've never had any issues with using them. They are cleaned once a week and aren't allowed anywhere cross contamination of dry products is possible.



Shyguy77

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 08:23 PM

I feel your employees pain, in the midst of summer it can get to over 110 degrees in parts of our processing area. We use both pedestal fans and larger industrial fans in these areas to help keep the air flow moving and bring relief to the employees. These ofc are all on our master sanitation schedule and we have never had a problem with auditors (FDA, BRC, AIB ........)



FoodSafety007

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 10:17 PM

As long as the fans are stored off floors and cleaned periodically they should be good for use in production areas.



Tony-C

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 01:49 PM

Generation of air borne contamination, you will need to assess the risk. If your filling area is enclosed with positive air pressure then less of a risk. Monitor with exposure plates and/or particle counts. Cleaning, fogging and filtration assist in reducing contamination risks.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



Avila

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 02:32 PM

I think auditors will be more concern on the possibility of the operator's sweat falling down to the mixing tank during summer season



makkawi

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 04:08 PM

Many thanks






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