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Is S275 Steel food safe?


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#1 MatthewA

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 06:14 PM

I'm currently trying to buy a plate of steel from a local supplier for use as what is known as a pizza steel, something that's just like a pizza stone except using steel is more effective. Preferably I'd like to buy A36 steel since I know for a fact that this is food safe if prepared correctly. My local supplier can offer me S275 steel which after some quick research i've found is very similar in composition to A36 steel which leads me to believe that much like A36, it is safe. The company i'm buying from offer a plough ground finish so the metal will be raw and rust free but even so I plan to thoroughly clean it before use. I know it's perhaps a long shot but I was wondering if anyone were able to have any knowledge whether this type of steel is indeed food safe.



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 03:24 AM

Dear Matthew,

 

Intriguing question, thank you and Welcome to the forum ! :welcome:

 

I shall be amazed if anyone here knows what A36, S275, pizza steel, plough ground finish, mean, let alone with respect to FS.

 

But here's hoping !

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS - my first thought would be to ask the supplier as far as general FS is concerned. And the validation.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 Slab

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 01:52 AM

They are both structural steels, but similarity may be closer to a A570Gr40.  A36 is the most common of structural steels and this makes it cheap and readily available.

Since this is a food safety question I assume the intent is the chemistry of the steel (leaching of latent heavy metals?).  Ask for a chem cert from your supplier proving equality and you should be good with regulation.

 

http://www.islandste...com/3Chart.html (third table)

 

Of course my experience with steel is in the oil drilling industry, and not food.  


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#4 cazyncymru

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 11:41 AM

Hi MatthewA

 

When I  was doing my Food Contact Surface Risk Assessment, I referred to Regulation (EC) no 1935/2004 on Materials and articles intended to come into contact with food and www.bssa.org.uk (selection of stainless steel for the food processing industries)

 

Hope they help

 

Cazx



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#5 MatthewA

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 02:43 PM

Thanks all, very helpful :D



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 07:45 PM

Dear All,

 

Happened to come across this thread recently which I had previously missed the end of.

 

Using the excellent link suggested by Caz, I found an article on “Food-Grade” Stainless Steels which may be of interest to some people (attached below).

 

The article seems to imply (by omission) that none of the grades mentioned in  the OP are typically regarded as “Food-Grade”. :smile:

 

Attached File  Selection of stainless steels for the food processing industries.pdf   42KB   37 downloads

 

i also noticed this useful matrix of some of the grades in use for food applications  –

 

Attached File  selected SS grades for Food,Beverage Industries.png   111.29KB   5 downloads

 

Nonetheless, if one explores the subject a little further, the “Food-Grade” reality is perhaps a little more complex, eg –

 

(1) Is stainless steel safe?

Stainless steel is one of the most common materials found in kitchens today.  It's used in everything from appliances to cookware, dishware, flatware and utensils because it is durable, easy to sanitize and corrosion resistant to various acids found in meats, milk, fruits and vegetables.  Most importantly though, stainless steel is a safe option when it comes to use with food and beverage, as there are no chemicals that can migrate into your food from these products

 

http://mightynest.co...04-188-and-1810

 

as compared to –

 

(2) Warning

Despite the fact that T304 is safe to use with foods, you should not store foods or liquids for long periods of time in T304 containers. Although T304 resists rust, the oxygen forming the protective surface with chromium can become depleted during long-term storage, allowing corrosion to occur.

http://www.ehow.com/...ood-grade_.html

 

And then –

 

(3) 430
Products made from this food grade generally have less nickel content and a lower resistance to corrosion and temperature. It’s best to dry these containers right after washing.

You may also notice that products will say 18/8, 18/10, 18/0 beside the grade. The first number is the percentage of chromium that is contained in the stainless steel. The second number is the amount of nickel. The higher the numbers, the more rust resistant the product will be. Nickel is safe in small quantities but can provoke a reaction in people with an allergy to it. The average adult consumes between 150 to 250 micrograms of nickel per day. Small doses of chromium, like iron, are good for your health, but can be harmful in higher amounts—50 to 200 micrograms per day is considered safe. One meal prepared with stainless steel equipment (such as stainless steel pots and pans) gives you about 45 micrograms of chromium, according to Health Canada

http://www.canadianf...-safe-for-food/

 

(4) This forum thread also discusses a few more Food-Grade “possibilities” –

http://www.practical...d-grade-227451/

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#7 Slab

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 11:26 PM

Great information, Charles!  


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#8 Snookie

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 11:29 PM

Interesting!


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#9 AS NUR

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 10:02 AM

nice info charles






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