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Ideas on how to hygienically handle Recipe Books?


Best Answer liberator, 18 December 2014 - 04:20 AM

With the advancement in printing technologies could you get a printer to print the recipes onto laminate film which is then applied to a thin polycarbonate sheet, or even direct printing onto polycarboate or similar? - Not sure of cost though and how many recipes you would be talking about. It would be fairly permanent and easy to clean.

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#1 MQA

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 02:09 AM

Hi to all, 

 

I'm a bit stuck on this one.  Recipe Books.   

 

One site uses plastic pockets.  All recipes individually printed, in its own plastic pocket, all neatly filed in a folder.  Needless to say, the folder has now seen better days.  

 

Another site laminates each printed recipe.  Lasts longer than the first option, but does eventually wear out - edges with doggy ears.  

 

Both above options have hygiene issues - no matter how often you tell staff to handle the paperwork with clean hands, you will always have a culprit that doesn't.  At times, life is too busy therefore can understand why sometimes I'll find a doughy mix on a recipe page. 

 

Currently the process is: 

  • Place recipe is plastic covering (laminated or plastic pocket) 
  • Recipe book on Cleaning Schedule - daily 

 

Anyone got better ideas on how to handle the Recipe Book/Folder?  

 

Computerised screens not an option due to cost factor.  Is on the wishful list though.  

 

Thanking you in advance for your input.  



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#2 Simon

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 10:55 AM

I think laminated is far superior to plastic pockets as they are sealed and are cleanable and can get wet etc.

As long as they are laminated properly...also I would tend to use a thicker gauge laminating pouch for added durability.

 

I can't think of a better idea. :dunno:


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#3 Mr. Incognito

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 12:34 PM

I agree with Simon.  I've seen both used.

It might help to know what your facilities make.  A higher risk process, like milk based products, might be much better with a heavy laminate sheet so that they can be cleaned if they get bad.


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#4 Tony-C

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 01:31 PM

Yep, I'm with Simon, heavy gauge laminate.

 

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#5 RG3

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 05:06 PM

Yes laminating is the way to go. You're already on the correct course placing it on the daily SSOP's. If you're worried about hygiene just look at the process. Make sure your operators are cleaning their hands, new gloves after touching the recipe book. I'm sure no auditor can contest that.



#6 MQA

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 10:19 AM

Thanks to all.  Good to know I was on the right track... just wasn't sure if there was a better solution.  

 

In saying so though, the better solution for me is stronger laminate... heavy gauge laminate.  I think this will work like a treat.  

 

Also, I need to ensure the quality control team are monitoring the recipe books to break the culture.  Notify staff immediately during GMP audits that the Cleaning Schedule isn't being adhered.  Yup, I have given myself extra work to do... another item to add to the GMP audits, doh.

  

To answer someone's question about the kind of sites: one is a cake-making kitchen; the other is a catering kitchen (food consumed immediately).  

 

Thank you to you all!  xx



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#7 liberator

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 04:20 AM   Best Answer

With the advancement in printing technologies could you get a printer to print the recipes onto laminate film which is then applied to a thin polycarbonate sheet, or even direct printing onto polycarboate or similar? - Not sure of cost though and how many recipes you would be talking about. It would be fairly permanent and easy to clean.



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#8 Simon

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 08:00 AM

That a great idea liberator.


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#9 MQA

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 10:58 AM

Thank you, liberator.  

 

I will definitely look into that.  

 

Laminating costs money anyway so may as well conduct a price comparison.  

 

Thanks, again!



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#10 fgjuadi

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 12:21 PM

Thank you, liberator.  

 

I will definitely look into that.  

 

Laminating costs money anyway so may as well conduct a price comparison.  

 

Thanks, again!

Ah, laminating is super cheap!   A machine to laminate is anywhere from $20 to a couple hundred dollars, but once you buy it, you can laminate EVERYTHING.  Even passports and driver's licenses!

 

If you buy one, you will never stop laminating.  For thick gauge the temp has to set at the highest and if you have a weak machine you might wanna run it through twice, but yeah.  Totally worth the investment on this one.


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#11 MQA

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 10:45 AM

To magenta_majors.

 

Lol.  Yes, to start with laminating is cheap.  But it does get expensive.  One site I work with laminates almost everything.  They have over twenty locations, so it gets costly.  

 

Thanks for the tip on high temperature for the thick gauge.  



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