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Sign in/ sign out on visitor log

tags food defence visitors

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Dr Vu

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 03:46 PM

hi guys

 

 happy friday!!!

 

 i am working on this neat way of identification tagging ( smart tag)..

 

 

the tag has a proviision  for  name , person visiting and  time in... and you peel and  stick. There is a carbon-copy of this informatio retained . After 24 hrs on the peeled sticker  there is a big ' void ' that comes imprints making it  not  re-usable

 

 however there is no provision for sign out. Any foreseeable issues with this in an audit situation? how important is it in having a sign out time? what if we cross out ( on the carbon copy) when some one leaves the building?

 

 

 your input is always valuable


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Simon

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 08:55 PM

I can't exactly visualize your system, but I guess if you write into your procedure that a 'cross out' means the visitor has left then it should be ok.  Though you don't have a departure time.


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Dr Vu

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 10:12 PM

Thanks Simon.I can try that and see how it works..

 

 i passed it on to the health and safety team for their input  as well since the evacuation and all else falls under their Program


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mgourley

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 10:24 PM

I would agree with Simon. You have to have some way to declare that the person has indeed left the facility.

How you choose to do that is entirely up to you, as long as you are doing what you say.

 

Marshall



BrianPilot

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 11:45 PM

Access Control often is great for people entering a facility, but as the others mention, getting people to sign out is always a challenge. I worked in ITAR compliant buildings for several years and, naturally, we had security desks monitoring and checking the flow of people from the facility. For businesses that don't have this level of infrastructure, something like what you're describing is a good first step. 

 

I think one of the key attributes of a system for tracking people at a facility is that you should make the presence of a non-employee very apparent. An example I've seen is a peg board that has essentially tokens hanging on hooks. Visitors get a token when they arrive (could be anything ... use a plastic fork if you want) and have to hang it back up when they leave. 

 

This particular facility had the board painted so it was obvious when a token was missing. The goal of the system was not necessarily to have all tokens accounted for (people always were leaving with them still in their pocket), but to raise the awareness of WHY a token was missing. Is that person still in the building? Who are they? Etc, Etc. 

 

The solutions that are most effective at physical access control involve a system and culture of awareness about visitor tracking. Making the tracking mechanism highly visible is something I think is important. Anyone who walked by that pegboard and saw a missing token had to decide to not say anything, and that encourages people to be responsible and take part. 

 

That said, if you are looking for a good visitor management system that does things like printing adhesive badges, etc (and is ITAR compliant, btw), this one is super easy to set up:  The iPad Receptionist

 

We looked at a bunch of these systems and this one had the most transparent pricing and best feature set. Took about 5 minutes to set up. 

 

Hope that helps. Sorry for the long post. 



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herdy

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Posted 12 November 2015 - 03:05 PM

I have always been told that the sign-out is relevant in the case of emergency. For example, if a fire were to occur, the responders could use that to know who in addition to the employees needs to be accounted for. I would think that a cross-out would work in the same way, so I would think that should be fine.

 

Our place is small enough that our employees just know who works there and who doesn't and know to ask/ escort those who do not. However, we have been talking about getting different colored PPE for the visitors so they will be noticed for sure. As an example, different colored hair nets or hard hats or a different type of safety glasses. Even goggles instead of glasses could work! I have toured places like that and it seemed really effective. Anytime I wasn't with someone who worked there, another employee would come up and ask me who I was and where I needed to be. It also helps with their own safety protocols. If someone is obviously unfamiliar with their processes because they have a different color hair net or whatever, they will know to be extra cautious when doing things, like on a forklift or things like that.

 

Just a couple of ideas, I want to look into iPad receptionist thing as well!







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