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ISO 22000: a pointless standard


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fed

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 08:25 AM

Hello everyone my first time on here. I read an ISO 22000 article a couple of days back, it was the first I'd heard about the standard. I work for a very large food business supplying ALL the major UK retailers. I ask myself why I've not heard about it and conclude because nobody is interested in it except maybe consultants and certification bodies.

Why haven't I heard of it? If it was of interest you could be sure my customers would be telling me about it. If I got this right the standard is very generic so how can that be useful to me when we use the BRC model in our businesses.

Your survey just about sums up the real interest. :thumbdown:



Bak

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 09:12 AM

Hello everyone my first time on here. I read an ISO 22000 article a couple of days back, it was the first I'd heard about the standard. I work for a very large food business supplying ALL the major UK retailers. I ask myself why I've not heard about it and conclude because nobody is interested in it except maybe consultants and certification bodies.

Why haven't I heard of it? If it was of interest you could be sure my customers would be telling me about it. If I got this right the standard is very generic so how can that be useful to me when we use the BRC model in our businesses.

Your survey just about sums up the real interest. :thumbdown:


BRC model is certainly a good instrument...but does that mean that there is no interest in a GLOBAL one ? I'm a fruit grower in Senegal and very interested in Food safety issues.I humbly think that ISO 22000 will boost the interest in Food Safety Management :spoton:


fed

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 09:20 AM

BRC model is certainly a good instrument...but does that mean that there is no interest in a GLOBAL one ? I'm a fruit grower in Senegal and very interested in Food safety issues.I humbly think that ISO 22000 will boost the interest in Food Safety Management :spoton:

I take it in Senegal there is no recognised food safety standard for fruit growing; you use the HACCP model though? ISO 22000 is generic supposedly for fruit grower, abatoir, salt and pepper packer, restaurant - how can it work without explicit requirements fro each industry, its meaningless.


Bak

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 11:02 AM

I take it in Senegal there is no recognised food safety standard for fruit growing; you use the HACCP model though? ISO 22000 is generic supposedly for fruit grower, abatoir, salt and pepper packer, restaurant - how can it work without explicit requirements fro each industry, its meaningless.

In Senegal like in many other countries regulations are based on Codex Alimentarius , we don't have a homemade document..however ISO 22k is a management model contrary to IFS,BRC...which are prescriptions models...If the haccp method can be applied to various activities why not 22K ?


fed

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 12:07 PM

Hello Bak I've gotten over my Monday morning blues now. :bye: If you believe ISO 22000 is a useful tool for managing your food safety system then who am I to argue; after all I've not even read the standard yet. :oops: I will. When I say that the standard is pointless my comment is based purely on the state of play in the UK and we are OK. :thumbup:



Bak

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 12:12 PM

Hi Fed,
No harm done ;) ...actually I'm very interested in the perception of 22K among european professionals (as I export my products to France and look to diversify..)
I gather from your various posts that BRC satisfies you entirely right ?



fed

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 01:40 PM

As we supply to the UK only our sites all have BRC Food. Our customers require us to have it and we require it of our suppliers from the UK and overseas. I just cannot see the benefit of ISO 22000 myself, unless we wanted to export to somewhere like the United States then a global recognised standard I can see being useful yes. If you wanted to get into France and other European countries then BRC+IFS are the ones to go for, they are more or less the same and I think you can do a dual audit.

What kind of fruits do you grow Bak?



Bak

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 04:41 PM

As we supply to the UK only our sites all have BRC Food. Our customers require us to have it and we require it of our suppliers from the UK and overseas. I just cannot see the benefit of ISO 22000 myself, unless we wanted to export to somewhere like the United States then a global recognised standard I can see being useful yes. If you wanted to get into France and other European countries then BRC+IFS are the ones to go for, they are more or less the same and I think you can do a dual audit.

What kind of fruits do you grow Bak?

We grow melon charentais type (french type if you want). We are preparing an Eurepgap certification at the moment (audit scheduled for November) and after that we shall start the 22K adventure...but we are keeping a good eye on IFS and BRC.. :smarty:


fed

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 04:49 PM

I haven't a clue about charentais melons, but I bet they are tasty; I could do with something cool and refreshing like that. You are wise to keep an open mind Bak from Senegal; surely not a dumbass like me. :spoton:



Simon

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 08:07 PM

Mmm melons - maybe you could provide some samples Bak? Or at least a photo to whet our appetites. :biggrin:

Simon


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Bak

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 08:58 PM

Mmm melons - maybe you could provide some samples Bak? Or at least a photo to whet our appetites. :biggrin:

Simon


Here we go...pic of one of our pallets from last christmasAttached File  palette_Casino_No_l_2005.JPG   251.45KB   69 downloads


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Posted 13 February 2006 - 09:07 PM

Not quite the same as having a big pair in your hands :yeahrite: but nice all the same - thanks Bak. Are they also called cantaloupe melons? They look similar.


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Bak

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 06:58 PM

Not quite the same as having a big pair in your hands :yeahrite: but nice all the same - thanks Bak. Are they also called cantaloupe melons? They look similar.

yep cantaloup is another name for it, however what one call cantaloup in UK or in the US is usually a long shelf life melon (3-4 weeks) while in France "traditional" melon (cantaloup or charentais) is a very tasty one with only 4 to 9 days of shelf-life


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Posted 14 February 2006 - 08:17 PM

yep cantaloup is another name for it, however what one call cantaloup in UK or in the US is usually a long shelf life melon (3-4 weeks) while in France "traditional" melon (cantaloup or charentais) is a very tasty one with only 4 to 9 days of shelf-life


Now you're really making my mouth water; do you do anything else apart from melons?

BTW not much time to get from Senegal to France.

Simon

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Bak

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 07:39 PM

Now you're really making my mouth water; do you do anything else apart from melons?

BTW not much time to get from Senegal to France.

Simon

Sorry ..been away for a while

We produce also tomatos for the domestic market .Freight time from France to Senegal is five days...
Cheers





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