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How to make a Master Sanitation Plan in poultry slaughter?


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#1 khaterinaf

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 11:11 AM

Hey, all... i am a newbie in this forum and i am a beginner in  food safety and quality controller. please help and conduct me to build a master sanitation plan in poultry slaughter company that i've worked in. Thanks so much...

 

 

Regards,

Khaterina Fitriani.



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 12:57 PM

Hey, all... i am a newbie in this forum and i am a beginner in  food safety and quality controller. please help and conduct me to build a master sanitation plan in poultry slaughter company that i've worked in. Thanks so much...

 

 

Regards,

Khaterina Fitriani.

 

Hi Khaterina,

 

Is any particular FS Standard involved ? eg SQF, etc

 

PS - welcome to the Forum ! :welcome:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 gfdoucette07

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 02:39 PM

Khaterina

 

Here is my advice and how I generally build my MSS. I divide the plant into dept if not already, then walk through and look at EVERYTHING in the room and ask yourself how how often should this be cleaned? If its machinery then its probably CIP or covered on a daily clean up list but what about...

 

Floors, Walls, ceiling/ beams, doors, windows, trash receptacles, carts/shelves/cupbords. tops of control panels, control screens/keyboads/switches, tools/brushes/buckets. pipes/hose exteriors, eyewashes/fire extinguishers, light fixtures, chairs/stools, I could go on and on.  But if you ask for EACH item in each department then you will be ready when an auditor asks when the last time the undersides of your tanks or insides of your brush handle connection was cleaned

 

G



#4 Wowie

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 09:48 PM

At my former life in poultry processing, we used a similar method to.

 

I'm not sure if you have contract sanitation or if your company performs sanitation. There should be SOP's regarding cleaning procedures of equipment, the chemicals that will be used, how they will be used, and at what concentrations. People do this in many different ways. Some have a single form with What (Equipment), How (cleaning procedure), When (frequency), Who (Responsible person), and with what chemicals, at what concentration.

 

I've found it more manageable, and easier for employees performing the job, to have a cleaning manual for the sanitors. For pieces of equipment (stunners, scalders, kill blade, openers, etc), there was a picture of the equipment AND and indication as to the location for the E-stop and lockout points. On the same sheet, or the opposite sheet, the cleaning procedure was listed. This allowed training on each piece of equipment for new sanitors to be very easy, and met that part of the master sanitation schedule.

 

Additionally, pre-operational swabbing and inspection for daily cleaning verified those cleaning locations. A master copy of equipment that was cleaned daily (down to knives, knife dips, etc) double as both an equipment checklist and the swab list.

 

What we called a "Master Cleaning" or "Master Sanitation" was then used for anything that was cleaned Less Than Daily. (Overhead fans, ceiling lights, etc) and anything that was on a cleaning rotation (numbered forklifts, auxillary rooms, locker rooms, etc). This list had each department (Live Hang, Picking Room, Evisceration, Chiller Room, Paw Room) listed and any and every possible piece of equipment or structure in that room that would need cleaning. Frequency of cleaning was agreed upon by the food safety team and was changed as we felt the need. This could be as often or as infrequent as you would like. Weekly, monthly, and quarterly are fairly common. The person who was responsible for ensuring each item on the Master Cleaning form was cleaned at the appropriate frequency would initial each week/month/quarter that it was done. 

 

Any equipment, utensil, transportation device, disposal equipment, or structure was included either on the pre-operational list or on the master cleaning list.

 

Each quarter, I, as the FSQA Manager, would verify the effectiveness of the Master Cleaning Schedule, the cleanliness of each area/item on the schedule, and that every item was on the list that needed to be.

 

That may be very wordy, and may not be at all what you're looking for. 

 

Items that were often missed - Carts used to move QA/QC testing tools around, carts used to transport tubs, inspector seats and arm guards, floor grates, handwashing sinks, doors, maintenance shop corners.



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#5 khaterinaf

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 05:50 AM

Hi Khaterina,

 

Is any particular FS Standard involved ? eg SQF, etc

 

PS - welcome to the Forum ! :welcome:

Yes, we use FSA from any brand in indonesia...

Could you help us? thanks for your attention...



#6 khaterinaf

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 09:04 AM

At my former life in poultry processing, we used a similar method to.

 

I'm not sure if you have contract sanitation or if your company performs sanitation. There should be SOP's regarding cleaning procedures of equipment, the chemicals that will be used, how they will be used, and at what concentrations. People do this in many different ways. Some have a single form with What (Equipment), How (cleaning procedure), When (frequency), Who (Responsible person), and with what chemicals, at what concentration.

 

I've found it more manageable, and easier for employees performing the job, to have a cleaning manual for the sanitors. For pieces of equipment (stunners, scalders, kill blade, openers, etc), there was a picture of the equipment AND and indication as to the location for the E-stop and lockout points. On the same sheet, or the opposite sheet, the cleaning procedure was listed. This allowed training on each piece of equipment for new sanitors to be very easy, and met that part of the master sanitation schedule.

 

Additionally, pre-operational swabbing and inspection for daily cleaning verified those cleaning locations. A master copy of equipment that was cleaned daily (down to knives, knife dips, etc) double as both an equipment checklist and the swab list.

 

What we called a "Master Cleaning" or "Master Sanitation" was then used for anything that was cleaned Less Than Daily. (Overhead fans, ceiling lights, etc) and anything that was on a cleaning rotation (numbered forklifts, auxillary rooms, locker rooms, etc). This list had each department (Live Hang, Picking Room, Evisceration, Chiller Room, Paw Room) listed and any and every possible piece of equipment or structure in that room that would need cleaning. Frequency of cleaning was agreed upon by the food safety team and was changed as we felt the need. This could be as often or as infrequent as you would like. Weekly, monthly, and quarterly are fairly common. The person who was responsible for ensuring each item on the Master Cleaning form was cleaned at the appropriate frequency would initial each week/month/quarter that it was done. 

 

Any equipment, utensil, transportation device, disposal equipment, or structure was included either on the pre-operational list or on the master cleaning list.

 

Each quarter, I, as the FSQA Manager, would verify the effectiveness of the Master Cleaning Schedule, the cleanliness of each area/item on the schedule, and that every item was on the list that needed to be.

 

That may be very wordy, and may not be at all what you're looking for. 

 

Items that were often missed - Carts used to move QA/QC testing tools around, carts used to transport tubs, inspector seats and arm guards, floor grates, handwashing sinks, doors, maintenance shop corners.

Thankyou so much Mr/Mrs Wowie, your advice is very helpfull to me. My company is the newbie in poultry slaughtering. So, we have to build up any rules to make our production running well. I'll try to make sanitation SOP and master sanitation first, and then make the other rules. i hope you are available too when i have more question about sanitation and quality assurance.

 

Regards,

Khaterina F.



#7 Wowie

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 12:10 PM

Thankyou so much Mr/Mrs Wowie, your advice is very helpfull to me. My company is the newbie in poultry slaughtering. So, we have to build up any rules to make our production running well. I'll try to make sanitation SOP and master sanitation first, and then make the other rules. i hope you are available too when i have more question about sanitation and quality assurance.

 

Regards,

Khaterina F.

 

 

Great! I'll absolutely be here. :) 






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