Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Vendor Approvals for Commodity Items


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 ncwingnut

ncwingnut

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 82 posts
  • 21 thanks
5
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:North Carolina
  • Interests:Horses, Boxer dogs, cross stitch, MMORPGs, regulatory affairs stuff...and on and on....

Posted 09 April 2018 - 01:17 PM

I know that in the past, when we have a vendor we purchase their product through a broker, say, organic canola oil, we required the broker's 3rd party certificate, audit report, or had them complete our risk assessment, and they were responsible for getting the audit report and 3rd party cert from the manufacturer.

 

However, with the new FSMA PC rules, are we, as the purchaser required to ensure we have these?  Also, has anyone run into resistance from manufacturers providing this documentation when the broker asked for it?

 

In this case, they sent a redacted SQF Cert.  It had all the manufacturer info, etc, completely blacked out, to where I could not read any of it.

 

We just want to make sure we are compliant on our end.

 

Thanks much,

Lynn



#2 MsMars

MsMars

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 594 posts
  • 192 thanks
138
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 09 April 2018 - 03:29 PM

We've had issues with both manufacturers reluctant to give information and requesting that we go through the broker as well as brokers unwilling to give their information and requesting that we contact the manufacturer directly. Last year's supplier audit updates were a frustrating merry-go-round for me and I'm not looking forward to doing it again coming up this spring. 

 

Basically I was able to do a risk assessment of the raw materials that were manufactured by the ones that were not willing to provide information because luckily it all involved low-risk materials.  I obtained the broker's information and a letter of guarantee from the broker.  If it involved higher-risk products, we would definitely be pushing back a little harder for this information directly from the manufacturer.



#3 FurFarmandFork

FurFarmandFork

    Food Safety Consultant, Production Supervisor

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,264 posts
  • 576 thanks
170
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon, USA

Posted 09 April 2018 - 03:34 PM

In this case, they sent a redacted SQF Cert.  It had all the manufacturer info, etc, completely blacked out, to where I could not read any of it.

 

 

 

Haha, super sketch. If they claim to be SQF, I don't bother getting the certificate, you can use the public search to look up whether their certification is current or not.

If the broker won't provide manufacturer information, I'd instead send a "supplier contract" their way that states they accept all liability for the safety of the product if sufficient evidence points to the ingredient as root cause. :)


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

#4 Dan McCarthy

Dan McCarthy

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 5 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 April 2018 - 03:39 PM

I've had issues where the brokers have no clue, and they refer you to the manufacturer.  Haven't had anything censored by a broker, yet.



#5 MsMars

MsMars

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 594 posts
  • 192 thanks
138
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 09 April 2018 - 04:02 PM

Haha, super sketch. If they claim to be SQF, I don't bother getting the certificate, you can use the public search to look up whether their certification is current or not.

If the broker won't provide manufacturer information, I'd instead send a "supplier contract" their way that states they accept all liability for the safety of the product if sufficient evidence points to the ingredient as root cause. :)

 

If the manufacturer info was completely blacked out, I don't know how successful you'd be in trying to look them up on the database without a name.  (What was the point of your broker even sending the SQF certification if you don't even know who it applies to?  :lol: Super suspicious!)  Either way, completely agree with FFF, get a signed contract or letter from the broker including language about food safety liability.



#6 moskito

moskito

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 361 posts
  • 72 thanks
14
Good

  • Germany
    Germany
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 April 2018 - 10:51 AM

Hi,

 

we don't buy from brokers hiding informations from the manufacturer. We and our customers need full insight in the manufaturing process, HACCP etc.

 

Rgds

moskito






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate