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Pragmatism and quality management


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#1 weloveplastic

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 01:04 PM

The definition of Pragmatic is 'Dealing with things sensibly and realistically in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical considerations', 'doing what's best'. How does one mix the theory to the practical? Is it possible to be a pragmatic quality manager?  I am trying to step out of my angry jacket. I am tired of fighting. It's not working. Thank you for this Forum, by the way.


Edited by weloveplastic, 13 June 2018 - 01:06 PM.


#2 Scampi

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 01:16 PM

I think you ought to be pragmatic in your role. Our job as quality/safety folks is 1) ensure that the food we produce is safe and wholesome and 2) look out for the financial best interests of the company you work for.

 

That may include having to adjust the frame of reference, there is usually more than 1 way to skin a cat as it were.

 

If you feel as though you are fighting all of the time, perhaps your personnel ethics simply do not align with your employer and that will likely never change, which doesn't necessarily make either wrong, just different.

 

In an ideal world, I would love to be able to dig my heels in and demand X Y and Z, but there are budget, employee, time constraints that all factor into decision making. 

 

For me,  I wish this industry would be much more pragmatic, some of the 3rd party certifications do not actually produce safer food, and being that the grocery industry is only looking out for the bottom line, we owe it to the industry to push back on ridiculous demands.  For example, I need a business continuity plan?????  How exactly does that produce safer food???  It doesn't, it just makes the big chains feel better that they will be able to still get your product, even if you have a fire so massive there is no business left.

 

 

I may be miles away from what you were originally getting at, and if so, my apologies 


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#3 MsMars

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 01:44 PM

We are all human so it only makes sense that we get angry about things that we feel strongly about, especially in this industry when our livelihood affects not only us but every consumer down the line. But, I think one can be both passionate and pragmatic at the same time.  Knowing where passion stops and pragmatism begins is the key, as well as knowing how to understand and realistically weigh risks across all departments of the company. It's a continual learning process that never stops.



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#4 dani2511

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 02:26 PM

I am also struggling with this at the moment - I can be quite passionate about food safety and advocating an environment that cares about it, but unfortunately my colleagues do not see it as a priority. I am at a loss as to what to do. At the moment, all I have decided to do is do what I am told, implement a QMS with BRC in Storage & Distribution in mind but knowing that in the end it will fail due to the poor culture of the business.



#5 weloveplastic

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 02:43 PM

Canada, United States, United Kingdom - from South Africa I say thank you for the reply and advice. Now I do not feel so alone. I will stay positive.



#6 dani2511

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 03:12 PM

Canada, United States, United Kingdom - from South Africa I say thank you for the reply and advice. Now I do not feel so alone. I will stay positive.

 

Ja, hou die blink kant  bo! Ek sal ook!



#7 weloveplastic

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 04:39 PM

Dani2511. I am going to try and find the balance I need. Stay passionate with what you do too. Hou die blink kant bo! :happydance:



#8 Gerard H.

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:20 PM

Hello Weloveplastic,

 

It's good that you launched the topic on this forum. I understand exactly what you're talking about. You worded the feeling of a large amount of quality people. It looks like the lists of more requirements coming from all sides is unstoppable.

 

However, you have to deal with it.

 

One of the tasks of the quality manager is to translate the theorical part to a practical workable situation. In such a way, that your products comply to all the requirements. So it's a combination of theory and practice.

 

What helps, is to look to your company from an objective standpoint of view (or look to other sectors where certification and compliance is of huge importance, such as in aviation and medicine). A company is a lot of different processes interfering together.

 

A certification scheme is a compilation of all the customer requirements. That makes it easier for customers to chose for your company. That's often forgotten, especially by the companies and people who already have the certificate.

 

The certificates evolve with the actuality, you and your company need to evolve together. Current developments are built into the certification standards, to keep their value and to guarantee the quality and food safety of your products. It's up to you to translate these in the company.

 

The certification standards and requirements are well thought, by very smart people who have an overview of our beautiful sector. That's why certification is a good basis for quality, food safety and customer satisfaction.

 

Furthermore, there is this forum, to find out how others gave input to fullfil the requirments of all kinds of food standards.

 

Kind regards,

 

Gerard



#9 weloveplastic

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 06:19 AM

Hello Weloveplastic,

 

It's good that you launched the topic on this forum. I understand exactly what you're talking about. You worded the feeling of a large amount of quality people. It looks like the lists of more requirements coming from all sides is unstoppable.

 

However, you have to deal with it.

 

One of the tasks of the quality manager is to translate the theorical part to a practical workable situation. In such a way, that your products comply to all the requirements. So it's a combination of theory and practice.

 

What helps, is to look to your company from an objective standpoint of view (or look to other sectors where certification and compliance is of huge importance, such as in aviation and medicine). A company is a lot of different processes interfering together.

 

A certification scheme is a compilation of all the customer requirements. That makes it easier for customers to chose for your company. That's often forgotten, especially by the companies and people who already have the certificate.

 

The certificates evolve with the actuality, you and your company need to evolve together. Current developments are built into the certification standards, to keep their value and to guarantee the quality and food safety of your products. It's up to you to translate these in the company.

 

The certification standards and requirements are well thought, by very smart people who have an overview of our beautiful sector. That's why certification is a good basis for quality, food safety and customer satisfaction.

 

Furthermore, there is this forum, to find out how others gave input to fullfil the requirments of all kinds of food standards.

 

Kind regards,

 

Gerard

I agree fully. My challenge is to 'translate the theoretical part to a practical workable situation' as you put it. And 'to deal with it'. Thank you Gerard.






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