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#1 sarahqa

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Posted 15 June 2018 - 07:51 PM

Hi,

We are making some soup/broth products (pH 5-6.5) that are being hot filled into polypropylene bottles. The process is still being developed, but the plan is to hot fill polypropylene bottles, cap with plastic lids that have foil liners, induction seal the lids/liners, invert the bottles to pasteurize, and then chill. They will not be stored refrigerated. My question is - where can I find the data on what temperature & amount of time we need to hold the bottles once they are capped and inverted? Not able to find much info on this.

 

Thanks!


Edited by Charles.C, 26 June 2018 - 12:14 AM.
see post6


#2 Scampi

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Posted 15 June 2018 - 08:00 PM

In order to bottle anything in that pH range, you need to file with FDA for low acid foods, and you will need a scheduled process prepared by a competent authority.  You won't find any specific data as it is dependant on far too many factors (not just pH, additional preservatives, brix levels, heat penetration on your actual product on your actual processing line, whether it's aseptic fill or not etc etc etc)

 

You've got the extra hurdle of not having a low pH to prevent botulism spores from growing I'm not sure that hot fill and hold will be sufficient, particularly with your pH level.

Are you planning on water bathing or retorting these?

 

http://www.foodpoiso...s/juice-recall/

 

http://www.foodsafet...ed-apple-juice/

 

https://money.howstu...od-recalls2.htm

 

If you search this list http://www.afdo.org/foodprocessing  you should be able to find one in your state

 

You need to have your process approved by the FDA PRIOR to sale

 

https://www.fda.gov/...ACF/default.htm

 

https://www.fda.gov/...s/ucm103369.htm

 

https://www.accessda...rt=114&showFR=1


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#3 Harminnie

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 02:46 PM

Our Scheduled Process (Cornell University) told us to invert for a minimum of 5 minutes, although I'm not sure what this is based on-we're doing as told! Most of our products are the same pH as yours. If above 4.5 pH we need to do water activity. This is for when we fill into 5 gallon pails, which we usually ship inverted anyway. 



#4 Scampi

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 02:53 PM

So the inversion will be based on the temperature of the product in order to have a minimum 5 log reduction in pathogens 

 

If you were able to fill even hotter and get the bottles sealed and inverted faster, than you'd be able to reduce the inversion time

 

So basically, 5 minutes is the length of time need to kill all the pathogens at whatever temperature you're bottles are once inverted

 

 

My pH is below 4, you've mentioned in your first post that yours is between pH 5-6.5.........so I'm a bit confused here. I'm also wondering if Cornell knew you wouldn't be refridgerting your finished good.

 

I am still concerned about the safety of your finished product........OR did Cornell factor in reheating at home....


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#5 Scampi

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 02:54 PM

what temperature are you hot filling at?


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#6 sarahqa

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 04:42 PM

We are cooking the product above 165 prior to filling and then also hot filling above 165. I am not able to get much info on the inversion/hold process - if the product has already been cooked to achieve a 5 log reduction, what is the holding doing? I thought it was just to sterilize the inside of the bottle. Also, I just saw a typo in my first post - they WILL be stored refrigerated.. I see how that was confusing.

 

Scampi, I have not spoken with Cornell - that was another poster. 



#7 Scampi

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 05:06 PM

Oh, my apoligies sheckroth!  It was totally the non refrigerated that got me confused!!!

 

 

Information about these process is VERY hard to come by.

 

I don't think 165 is hot enough to sterilize the inside of the bottle.......you really should be hitting 185  see this link  http://efsonline.uga...-in-Georgia.pdf

 

https://aggie-hortic...ified_foods.pdf

 

www.fda.gov/ICECI/Inspections/InspectionGuides/ucm103369.htm  According to this; you are exempt from filing your process with the FDA


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#8 sarahqa

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 05:28 PM

Thanks Scampi, you had me scared with the filing process! 

 

I agree it is hard to come by. I have found similar information to the links you sent, but it seems that most of that data is for high acid/acidified (pH <4.6) foods that will be stored shelf stable. Since this product is stored refrigerated, my inclination is that it is just like any cook/chill process and there isn't really a time/temp parameter necessary for the sterilization of the container. I am thinking we just want to make sure it is filled hot to ensure that the product is not creeping into the temperature danger zone. I could be wrong though. 



#9 Scampi

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 05:44 PM

One of the links showed a minimum of 185 to sterilize the neck/cap.

 

All of the research I've done as late also requires a mimimum for 185 for pathogen lethality

 

Your single greatest risk is spoilage bacteria as your ph and being refrigerated

 

Good luck


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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:03 AM

We are cooking the product above 165 prior to filling and then also hot filling above 165. I am not able to get much info on the inversion/hold process - if the product has already been cooked to achieve a 5 log reduction, what is the holding doing? I thought it was just to sterilize the inside of the bottle. Also, I just saw a typo in my first post - they WILL be stored refrigerated.. I see how that was confusing.

 

Scampi, I have not spoken with Cornell - that was another poster. 

 

One of the understatements of the year. :smile:

 

I am thinking we just want to make sure it is filled hot to ensure that the product is not creeping into the temperature danger zone. I could be wrong though.

Yes, possibly. Pasteurization necessitates a detailed consideration of lethality IMO.

 

It's not my area at all but with respect to pasteurisation, the recommended temperature seems to be related to pH -

 

For foods with a pH value of 3.5 or less, 175 ° F (79.5 ° C) is a sufficient pasteurization temperature. Those foods with a pH range between 3.5 and 4 have a recommended pasteurization temperature of 185 ° F (85 ° C). For foods with a pH range of 4 to 4.3, the recommended pasteurization temperature rises to 195 ° F (90.5 ° C). Foods with a pH value of 4.3 to 4.5 have a recommended pasteurization temperature of 210 ° F (99 ° C).

Attached File  commercial canning.pdf   640.83KB   47 downloads

(above is for a "traditional" hot-fill of lower pH than present of course)

 

I presume the shelf-life of this refrigerated product will also differ to the, apparently, typical 6-12 months of shelf-stable, hot filled items.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#11 ronald.amigo

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 12:31 AM

Hi!

 

Based on my experience, hot, fill and hold process is normally designed for high acid or low pH products.

A processing authority would help you establishing your thermal process schedule.

 

For our products (canned juices), product is pasteurized to 91 to 97 deg C, filling temp is 91 deg C min, invert the can after seaming and hold for 1.5 to 5 minutes depending on can size.



#12 gud2ya

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 06:23 AM

can your PP bottle withstand 185F?



#13 Scampi

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 02:02 PM

There are new PP bottles coming out everyday.........new one to launch next year that can apparently withstand 210F (or boiling)


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