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Hazard analysis for coal in BBQ food production

coal hazard analysis BBQ

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#1 Zeeshan

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 11:29 AM

Our recent audit was tagged with a new finding. Hazard analysis for coal was found not carried out for our BarBeque product. This was newly added in our scope. Do somebody help me out to answer following queries in this concern?

 

1) Do I take "Coal" as a raw material or a processing aid or any other category?

 

2) Other than carcinogen theories all around, are there some logical and proven hazards under physical, chemical and microbiological categories?

 

3) Are there any affordable controls available to control hazards related to coal used in BBQ production?

 

Regards.

Zeeshan.

 

 



#2 Zeeshan

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 12:29 PM

1) Do I take "Coal" as a raw material or a processing aid or any other category?

Was unable to edit the above query so posting as additional comments as below:

Possible justification to tag coal as 'raw material or ingredient' is that fumes of coal when cover the BBQ product it induces a unique flavor and eccense.

Possible justification to tag coal as 'processing aid' is that none of its part is included in the product but its residues (fumes and flavor etc.) may include in the product and manufacture is not bound by regulations to mention that inclusion as raw material or ingredient on product label.



#3 Lesley.Roberts

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 03:53 PM

Hi Zeeshan 

 

I think this depends on the country of sale of the finished product.

 

I work for a company that has sites in Europe/Asia/USA and how we label additives/processing aids depends on the legislation for that country & also the country that the final product is to be sold into. So,it would probably be worth doing some research to determine what is permissible, also if you do decide it is an "ingredient" how would you quantify the % inclusion in final product?...



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#4 CEA_safety

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 09:04 PM

Hmmm. Especially given the heavy metals found in coal, as a customer, I would regard coal combustion residues on BBQ as an adulterant, not a processing aid. I would think a hazard analysis would require data to back up any claim that it does NOT contain carcinogens or heavy metals.


Edited by CEA_safety, 08 January 2019 - 09:06 PM.


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#5 livanezos

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 10:20 AM

I strongly suggest that you google: Solid fuels and firelighting products - Nordic Swan Ecolabel

 

And use their suggestions as specs for your suppliers. This will mitigate risk and make it easier for you to identify risks and conduct a risk analysis.



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