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Food Fraud Survey


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Poll: Have you assessed your food fraud vulnerability? (358 member(s) have cast votes)

Have you assessed your food fraud vulnerability?

  1. Yes (232 votes [64.80%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 64.80%

  2. No (52 votes [14.53%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 14.53%

  3. In Process (74 votes [20.67%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 20.67%

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#26 Charles.C

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 05:45 AM

We are retails shop units. our tools are observations, sale report, smell, sight. Interview..etc

 

look for sale reports to find any left overs used again or not..

tasting the food..

verifying the records..

 

Hi Sawad,

 

Actually the above is one component of the menu of factors involved in GFSI's  expectations for a  "Vulnerability Assessment".

 

@Spudslinger (Post 23) - IIRC SQF only requires the scope of food fraud to (ultimately) cover safety-related aspects. Excludes GMO ?


Edited by Charles.C, 27 February 2019 - 06:06 AM.
expanded

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#27 Jpainter

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 09:08 PM

Hello all, 

 

I recently completed our food fraud assessment and mitigation plan policy. We are a company that processes fresh and frozen chile products. With all products being single ingredient, with no additive it was determined that excess pesticide usage, or intentional adulteration by disgruntled employees were our two biggest risks of food fraud occurring to our products. 

I used the free FFVA tool provided by PwC/Ssafe to conduct our vulnerability assessment. I coupled this with a HACCP like document with areas of risk identified in the vulnerability assessment and the mitigations applied to control risks. For the second VACCP/TACCP combined document I made, I used several previous threads on this site relating to that topic. They were a huge help in getting ideas on how to format the mitigation section of the document. It can be a brain wracking ordeal making new documents with little background info, but all the input from posters on this site helped so much. 

Thanks to everyone!



#28 rajeev1965

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 11:24 AM

yes



#29 jcieslowski

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 08:15 PM

Our plant deals with potatoes and we found our food fraud to be GMO products or pesticide usage. We don't accept GMO products. Also https://ffv.pwc.com/vsat/#/ is the tool I used to assess our food fraud, our SQF Auditor accepted it

 

What do you do in the potato industry?  (former potato chip maker here)



#30 DPN

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 03:33 PM

I also found the PWC food fraud tool very helpful.



#31 Charles.C

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 06:33 AM

I also found the PWC food fraud tool very helpful.

 

3 customary  disadvantages appear to be -

 

(a) Involves an encyclopedia of questions.

(b) the web version does not always play nicely.

(c) seems to interpret existing data in an ad hoc way.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#32 Intlft96

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 04:46 PM

Thank you for all the information, it is enlightening. I was asked by one of our raw material assessment team if we had to go back further than 5 years. We did when we first began the assessments but I am torn now as to the length of time to 'go back' into the history of the item. I understand that if we have a long term supplier and known certification bodies awarding the suppliers a 'lesser; risk but what happens if we don't 'go back' and take into account the older risks? Just because the risk of adulteration or fraud is old, to me that doesn't mean the fraud cannot happen again and, in fact, the people who commit the fraud may be counting on their 'customers' not looking sufficiently deeply into the history. "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana    Feedback? Do we continue to capture the original fraud or adulteration? When does it fall away?



#33 pHruit

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 04:59 PM

Is there a specific reason not to go back further?
Has something changed in the industry that makes it a historical type of fraud genuinely no longer a risk any more?

I think you'll need to consider it in the context of individual materials/cases.
I know that some of our customers group everything beyond 5 years ago into one larger "historical cases" category, so they can take account of it without getting too tied up in little details.

But you may find that some of the historical ones are still popular as they're easy to perform, require some moderately specialist analysis to detect, and the world has a plentiful supply of greedy and unscrupulous people. For example, honey and fruit juices immediately spring to mind as examples of products that have been adulterated using roughly the same approach since at least the 1970s.
 



#34 Deepa John

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Posted 02 April 2019 - 08:13 AM

Please answer the survey and let us know what tools you used to assess your food fraud vulnerability, what you found and what prevention strategies you implemented.

 

Regards,

Simon

Dear,

 

I completed the Food Fraud vulnerability assessment . mainly I have referred USP - Food Fraud,2015.

I have one question. Our company is producing IcedCoffee. major ingredient is Coffee powder. Is the chicory content in the coffee powder is really an adulterant?. Food fraud database is giving such information. Actually supplier is declaring this in specification.

 

Expect your  valuable comments on this



#35 pHruit

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Posted 02 April 2019 - 08:20 AM

In this case the Chicory is potentially not an adulterant - it is mentioned in the databases as it can be used to adulterate coffee that is claimed to be 100% coffee.

If your supplier is openly declaring it, you are openly declaring it, and you're not required to comply with any defined standard of identity for coffee then this does not seem problematic to me.



#36 jkoratich712

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 12:03 PM

We are a bakery producing bread and rolls, that source ingredients predominately from the US with a few foreign suppliers. After doing some research, we decided to use HorizonScan for not only our food fraud vulnerability assessment, but also as a tool for evaluating known/reported food safety hazards. We did 3 separate assessments -  one on each ingredient, one on each on of our suppliers, and one on the country of origin for that particular ingredient. In addition to the annual full assessment, I receive daily emails with any new reported issues, which has made being aware of what is going on internationally much easier. Overall, we found 2 ingredients that had a known report of food fraud, and put processes in place to eliminate the risk for our business. Our SQF Auditor liked the HorizonScan system and was impressed with the amount of information and detail we were able to get out of it. It was a worthwhile investment for us.



#37 jenky

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 04:19 PM

We are a US-based supplier and also used HorizonScan for our food fraud and food safety assessments.  Like jkoratich712, we found it to be a great tool since you can conduct a risk assessment of the material, the supplier, and the country of origin.  It provides data globally, and the alerts are easy to set up so that you be notified instantly if there is risk that impacts your product, etc.  



#38 Charles.C

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 11:59 PM

We are a US-based supplier and also used HorizonScan for our food fraud and food safety assessments.  Like jkoratich712, we found it to be a great tool since you can conduct a risk assessment of the material, the supplier, and the country of origin.  It provides data globally, and the alerts are easy to set up so that you be notified instantly if there is risk that impacts your product, etc.  

 

Hi jenky,

 

I presume you are referring to, presumably paid services, something like -

 

https://www.foodchai...es/horizonscan/

or

https://www.fera.co....rizon-scan#form

 

In fact both companies seem to have the same picture ???

 

I note both offer free  trials of the service.

 

I also noticed this 2016  survey of 6 free options for "horizon scanning" (No.2 is no longer free).

 

https://www.qadex.co...anning-options/

 

Also referenced here -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...rizon-scanning/


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#39 jenky

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 01:16 PM

Hi jenky,

 

I presume you are referring to, presumably paid services, something like -

 

https://www.foodchai...es/horizonscan/

or

https://www.fera.co....rizon-scan#form

 

In fact both companies seem to have the same picture ???

 

I note both offer free  trials of the service.

 

Yes, I was referring to the Foodchain ID / Fera service (they are partners in the HorizonScan platform).  It is a paid subscription service - based on the number of users.  You can request a free demo where an account rep will show how the platform works for a commodity or ingredient specific to your business.  We were also able to take advantage of a free trial for a short period to use the platform on our own before committing to the subscription. 



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#40 John_E

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 09:14 PM

Tools, common sense.

Controls, no new ones that we weren't already implementing. Supplier evaluation and approval, trailer seals, incoming inspection, etc. I think the whole requirement is ridiculous and a waste of resources. Food fraud is done by criminals and happens because of lax procedures. I'm reasonably sure anyone on this site who has a basic understanding of distribution or food safety risks does not need to do any additional work.






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