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What biological hazards are associated with dry beans and grains?


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#1 D3P50001

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:02 PM

Performing a Hazard Analysis, what biological hazards are associated with dry beans and grains? Any information would be very helpful, thank you.



#2 Dr Vu

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:23 PM

 Google this

 

Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food: Draft Guidance for Industry


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#3 rebudke

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:53 PM

For grains, Bacillus cereus.



#4 The Food Scientist

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 07:03 PM

What types of beans? Do you perform the drying? 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#5 Gerard H.

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 07:14 PM

Hello,

Please mind the mycotoxins, especially for the grains.

Kind regards,

Gerard Heerkens



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 11:40 PM

Performing a Hazard Analysis, what biological hazards are associated with dry beans and grains? Any information would be very helpful, thank you.

 

Hi D3P,

 

if you mean a process like drying/roasting coffee beans, there is a typical hazard analysis (file cf1)  attached in this Post plus discussion of haccp factors in surrounding thread -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...fee/#entry80491


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 D3P50001

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 12:34 PM

Thank you for the feedback. We do not dry the beans. We just package beans and grains. We don't carry coffee beans, we package beans like; pinto beans, black beans, lentils. 



#8 Charles.C

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 02:24 PM

Thank you for the feedback. We do not dry the beans. We just package beans and grains. We don't carry coffee beans, we package beans like; pinto beans, black beans, lentils. 

 

Can search "beans" in this document to see BCPA hazards -

 

Attached File  PCHF-Guidance-Appendix-1-Hazards_Tables_01-17-2018.pdf   1.9MB   25 downloads

 

PS - can also see this brief thread -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...th-pinto-beans/


Edited by Charles.C, 12 April 2019 - 03:01 PM.
expanded

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#9 CVBC

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 01:01 PM

We are in the edible bean business as well.  Below is what our HACCP plan covers on Biological risk:

 

Dry beans do not have any inherent pathogens to cause illness.  It is possible, however, for

                      external pathogens (such as E Coli, Salmonella, etc.) to become attached to beans at the farm or,

                      in some cases, at this facility. 

 

 

                       

                                                                   

                        Norovirus                               

                        Salmonella                             

                        Hepatitis A                             

                        Shigella                                  

                        E Coli                                     

                        Clostreidum botulinum          

                        Campylobacter                       

                        Listeria                                   

 

                        The University of Nebraska, Lancaster County Extension Education, states that to properly cook

                        beans, the beans are to (212°F) and then be simmered (defined by several publications as 185°F

                        plus) for 1.5-2.0 hours.  Such cooking will inactivate all the above mentioned pathogens.  Since

                        all beans processed at this facility will be cooked after they leave this facility, no biological

                        factors are considered to be hazards at this facility.

 

Since the beans we package need to be cooked after our facility, we do not monitor for biological risk.  We are a dry cleaning facility and do not use water in any part of our facility.  We still have GMP require hand washing, clean shoes, etc. 

 

Hope this helps.



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