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How to Check the Age of Milk Powder?


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#1 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 04:40 AM

Hi Everyone,

I would like to know how to check the age of milk powder (Skim milk powder or whole milk powder) i.e. is there any method available to determine how old the milk powder is?

 

Thanks

Mahantesh



#2 Scampi

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 04:15 PM

Is it not marked with a production date or lot code?


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#3 zanorias

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 04:44 PM

What's the context?
Are you looking for a method to chemically test the powder to establish age?
If it's a case of you have stock and want to know production date, ask the supplier - they should be able to tell you the manufacture date for a certain batch. Occasionally it's included on the packaging, or evident if they've used julian code.



#4 The Food Scientist

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 06:28 PM

I agree with checking with the supplier. Is it that you want to establish an age for it? Perhaps shelf life studying?


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#5 Hank Major

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 07:17 PM

You could send samples out to a lab and check if it is out of spec.

 

This article https://www.scienced...022030279833007

says that the moisture content will increase and the various vitamins content will decrease.



#6 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 04:01 AM

We have this query from our top management and we do not know from whom the milk powder is supplied. Our regular supplier provides certificate of analysis and there will be shelf life on that.

 

But here the case is different, actually the sample is unknown and our management is asking to check the age of that milk powder. Is there any method available to check the age??

 

Thank u all for your valuable replies

 

Regards

Mahantesh

 

You could send samples out to a lab and check if it is out of spec.

 

This article https://www.scienced...022030279833007

says that the moisture content will increase and the various vitamins content will decrease.

 

 

I agree with checking with the supplier. Is it that you want to establish an age for it? Perhaps shelf life studying?

 

 

What's the context?
Are you looking for a method to chemically test the powder to establish age?
If it's a case of you have stock and want to know production date, ask the supplier - they should be able to tell you the manufacture date for a certain batch. Occasionally it's included on the packaging, or evident if they've used julian code.

 

 

Is it not marked with a production date or lot code?



#7 zanorias

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:17 AM

We have this query from our top management and we do not know from whom the milk powder is supplied.

 

But here the case is different, actually the sample is unknown

 

I'm not sure regards to a testing method to check the age. However my concern is that the supplier/source is unidentified - how would you comply with traceability requirements, and be confident the product is safe??



#8 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 06:25 AM

I'm not sure regards to a testing method to check the age. However my concern is that the supplier/source is unidentified - how would you comply with traceability requirements, and be confident the product is safe??

 

This is only sample, not a consignment and its a task given to us...



#9 Ryan M.

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:41 PM

A few tests you can do.

 

1.  Moisture.  If below 5% then it is still good.

2.  Titratable acidity.  If I recall correctly it should be 0.17% or less with skim milk powder and 0.14% or less with whole milk powder. **You can look up the dry powder standards under the US FDA, or american milk powder producers.  New Zealand is also a country that produces a significant amount of dry milk powders.

3.  Sensory test.  Make up with water and compare against powder samples that are fresh.

 

If the sample checks out on those three tests the age of the powder is meaningless.  Really, if packaged well and stored in good conditions you will have years and years of shelf-life out of milk powder.



#10 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 12 June 2019 - 04:19 AM

A few tests you can do.

 

1.  Moisture.  If below 5% then it is still good.

2.  Titratable acidity.  If I recall correctly it should be 0.17% or less with skim milk powder and 0.14% or less with whole milk powder. **You can look up the dry powder standards under the US FDA, or american milk powder producers.  New Zealand is also a country that produces a significant amount of dry milk powders.

3.  Sensory test.  Make up with water and compare against powder samples that are fresh.

 

If the sample checks out on those three tests the age of the powder is meaningless.  Really, if packaged well and stored in good conditions you will have years and years of shelf-life out of milk powder.

Thank you Ryan






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