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Legislation or standards for ATP measurements

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#1 Jim R Winther

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 12:20 PM

Dear colleagues,

Is there anyone in the network who is aware of the existence of internationally recognized standard, US norms or EU/US legislation for ATP measurements, possibly also for defined max. relative light units (RLU) for specific areas like food production?

Kind regards.



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 12:37 PM

Dear colleagues,

Is there anyone in the network who is aware of the existence of internationally recognized standard, US norms or EU/US legislation for ATP measurements, possibly also for defined max. relative light units (RLU) for specific areas like food production?

Kind regards.

 

Hi Jim,

 

 

An ATP measurement specifically for what ?

 

If you mean as corresponding to a "clean" surface, then the answer afaik is No. There are many suggestions from sellers of different ATP measuring units though.

 

I think the situation is analogous to microbiological counts.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 QAGB

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 12:46 PM

Dear colleagues,

Is there anyone in the network who is aware of the existence of internationally recognized standard, US norms or EU/US legislation for ATP measurements, possibly also for defined max. relative light units (RLU) for specific areas like food production?

Kind regards.

 

 

I am not aware of any specific standard, as I might expect each company's luminometer to be slightly different. However, the company you choose to supply your luminometer should be able to help you determine the correct max RLU per luminometer for your product/equipment type.

 

If needed you can ask them for their specific studies to show how they've validated the proper RLUs for product type. 



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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 12:54 PM

I would also add that at least one major supplier of ATP instruments issues a "statistical" quantitative  Procedure whereby each company can determine its own (baseline) ATP criteria for "cleanliness"  utilising  their own  ATP data.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#5 QAGB

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 01:44 PM

I would also add that at least one major supplier of ATP instruments issues a "statistical" quantitative  Procedure whereby each company can determine its own (baseline) ATP criteria for "cleanliness"  utilising  their own  ATP data.

 

That is correct. The company we dealt with did the same thing, but we chose to keep the baseline as they initially quoted. 



#6 zanorias

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 05:01 PM

I think it really depends what your operation is and what you are wanting to achieve. Hygiena has a default of >30 RLU = fail, but of course depending on the product and risk factor you would want to adjust the acceptability parameters to match the reality of the actual situation. For example, I previously used a Hygiena ATP device in a site that had a high risk zone, low risk zone, and specific equipment/times that required vegan suitable cleanliness (in a predominantly meat product based factory), so we had several limits depending on the purpose of the swab. Then you have things like potential allergen checks etc.

 

"Food production" is a very large area. Do you have a specific product/process in mind? 



#7 QAGB

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 05:50 PM

I think it really depends what your operation is and what you are wanting to achieve. Hygiena has a default of >30 RLU = fail, but of course depending on the product and risk factor you would want to adjust the acceptability parameters to match the reality of the actual situation. For example, I previously used a Hygiena ATP device in a site that had a high risk zone, low risk zone, and specific equipment/times that required vegan suitable cleanliness (in a predominantly meat product based factory), so we had several limits depending on the purpose of the swab. Then you have things like potential allergen checks etc.

 

"Food production" is a very large area. Do you have a specific product/process in mind? 

 

It also might be swab dependent (along with product/process type). I think our parameters were 50 RLU or greater = Fail. We then found out that the swab/luminometer didn't respond well to Quaternary Ammonia, and then had to use a different swab. Our parameters in that case were 250 RLU or greater = Fail. 

 

To the OP: Don't use my reference numbers...you really have to discuss this with the company that makes your luminometer.


Edited by QAGB, 21 October 2019 - 05:51 PM.


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#8 Ryan M.

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 10:40 PM

Nope...ATP has too many variables impacting the result.  You have to validate it for your process, equipment, and facility.



#9 Sdurbanfarmer

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Posted 14 January 2020 - 11:37 PM

Hi All,

 

I wanted to jump on this with a similar question. I am working with a fresh citrus packer and during our Primus inspection last week the inspector said the results of previous tests were too high and we needed to set a better threshold in the SOP. In reviewing the SOP it gives <100 RLU as pass and >100 RLU as fail. They are using a Hygiena that lists <50 pass for low risk vegetables or >75 for fail. I kind of walked into this situation so I am trying to piece it together so that if I do make a corrective action it makes sense.



#10 QAGB

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 07:21 PM

Hi All,

 

I wanted to jump on this with a similar question. I am working with a fresh citrus packer and during our Primus inspection last week the inspector said the results of previous tests were too high and we needed to set a better threshold in the SOP. In reviewing the SOP it gives <100 RLU as pass and >100 RLU as fail. They are using a Hygiena that lists <50 pass for low risk vegetables or >75 for fail. I kind of walked into this situation so I am trying to piece it together so that if I do make a corrective action it makes sense.

 

You should really contact Hygiena and ask them directly what your targets should be specifically. If Hygiena says you should be using the 100 RLU as a target, then you go with that, and get it in writing to satisfy any possible corrective actions or appeals from your inspection. If Hygiena says you should be lower than that, then you change your targets and your SOP.







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