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#1 Rol Natty

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 11:39 PM

My company order recipe for mango juice reconstitution by own mango concentrate 28 degree brix then and we get recipe in g/l from the recipe maker company. Can we use directly converting for our 5000 liter tank. Why u should to have carefully? and also sometimes we get the raw material mango concentrate 24 ,25,26,27,28,29,30,31 brix so how we can correct it also with sugar amount when we use it. Is there any advise u can give us is there unclear i will describe it thank you



#2 pHruit

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 08:10 AM

Hi,

Sorry, I'm not entirely clear what it is that you're trying to accomplish.
Are you making pure single-strength mango juice using juice concentrate / puree concentrate?

If so then you may need to ensure you don't over-dilute it based on the applicable minimum Brix requirements in the countries in which you're selling it. For EU export purposes the relevant minimums are in Directive 2012/12/EU, and for other countries there will be local regulations or, in some cases, the attached Codex standard is used.

I'm not sure where the sugar fits into this, though. Are you making a soft drink / nectar product? How is your recipe currently defined?

If it's based on a target amount of single-strength mango juice in the final product then you can calculate this from the Brix of the concentrate, but it'd help to know a bit more about exactly what you're trying to do ;)

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#3 Rol Natty

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 08:40 AM

K let me clear Recipe quantity for 1000liter
Oraganoc Mango purée concentrate(Min 28) 80kg
Sucrose Cryst 133 kg
Cmc 1.8kg
Citric acid monohydrate 0.7kg
Ascorbic acid 0.2 kg
Mango flavor 0.065kg
Beta carotene 0.1 kg
Demineralized water 841.060 kg

Final brix 14.8 — 15.2

So if i get organic mango concentrate with 20 degree brix or 35 degree brix how can calculate sugar amount and get the desired brix and how i will correct when i start production based on i received mango concentrate every time


Edited by Rol Natty, 21 February 2020 - 08:40 AM.


#4 pHruit

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 10:23 AM

Ok, so the first thing to do is to consider what we're measuring / looking at.
I think this post I wrote for a different but somewhat similar question may help as some background: https://www.ifsqn.co...ted-bx-content/

 

For the purpose of further discussion I'll consider Brix, rather than sugar, as this is arguably the most useful in a practical sense since it'll be what you're measuring.

We'll also ignore the subtleties of whether Brix actually represents soluble solids accurately in a juice product, and thus we'll assume that a 28bx mango puree conc contains 28g of soluble solids (mostly sugars, but other soluble minerals, acids etc) per 100g, and therefore 280g per kg.  

Similarly we will assume that the (insoluble) pulp content of all of the purees, as measured at single strength, is comparable. This won't affect the flavour/sugar level, but a significant difference might have an impact on mouthfeel, texture, and/or visual appearance. I wouldn't worry too much about this, as it would be unusual for a puree processor to intentionally adjust this - really you're only likely to see a significant difference if you're getting purees from very different sources (e.g. Indian Alphonso vs. Mexican Tommy Atkins), but in that case you'll find there is a very notable flavour difference between the varieties anyway. 

Your recipe has 80kg of this in it, so we're saying that 1000L of finished product contains 80 x 280 = 22400g of soluble solids from the 28bx mango puree-conc. 

If we want to use an alternative mango, we therefore have to calculate how much of it we need in order to achieve the same amount of soluble solids from the mango component in the recipe.  

For the 20bx product, we get 20g soluble solids per 100g, or 200g per kg. To achieve the same amount in the end product, we therefore need 22400/200 = 112kg of the 20bx puree. This is an increase compared to the original recipe so you'll then need to make a corresponding adjustment to how much water you add, since the 20bx concentrate contains a higher proportion of water than the 28bx version you were originally using. You therefore decrease the added water component by the difference, i.e. 112-80 = 32kg, so rather than 841.060kg water you'll instead need 841.060 - 32 = 809.06kg. 

Similarly, for the 35bx product (35g solids per 100g, 350g per kg) you need 22400/350 = 64kg of puree. This contains proportionally less water than the 28bx version, and you therefore need to replace the difference by increasing how much water you add, by 80-64 = 16kg, so your total water addition will then be 841.060 + 16 = 857.060kg.  

Final tips to consider:
1) Always start by adding less water than you think you will need, at least until you're comfortable with the recipe/process, as it's easy to then top up water to reduce the Brix into the target tolerance, whereas it's very difficult to take water out if your Brix result is too low ;) 

2) For mango it won't make much difference as it isn't generally a particularly acidic product, but for some juices (and particularly concentrates where the acidity levels are correspondingly higher) you will get more accurate results by calculating using the acid-corrected Brix value, rather than by using the one refractometric one that you measure directly. There is an attachment in the post that I linked to that can help you with this, if you don't already have a formula/table for it.



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#5 Rol Natty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 01:11 PM

Thank you so much pHruit  am not sure your  name is this but you are so kind and helpful in every question I have .just thank you for always support

can I have your contact address like LinkedIn ...

And also one additional question how to reduce let me explain I prepare 1000 liter juice final syrup  then I get 14.5brix

our standard brix is 14.0 brix  how to calculate the amount of water added to minimize the brix to 14.0 and also  is there to consider also


Edited by Rol Natty, 22 February 2020 - 01:12 PM.


#6 pHruit

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 10:26 AM

You can call me pHruit; I value my (quasi-)anonymity ;)

I'm happy to help where I can, but ideally this should be done on the forum as that way other people with similar questions get the benefit of all of the people who spend time here helping each other.

It'll take me a little while to type out a full answer to your question so I'll get back to you on that later today :)



#7 pHruit

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 06:26 PM

As promised, revisiting this to give a more detailed answer to your question.

 

To calculate how much of a given concentrate (or higher brix starting product) you need, it's probably easiest to break the calculation into two in two parts, at least until you're familiar with what it's doing. The first stage calculates how many grams of soluble solids are required per L to achieve the target finished product Brix, and then second calculates how many grams of concentrate (or starting liquid/blend) are required to provide this quantity of soluble solids. Obviously these can be combined into one once you’re familiar with it, but splitting it like this helps understand what’s going on to start with.

 

First stage:

Soluble solids required (g per L) = 1000 x [(Brix at single strength)/100] x (specific gravity at single strength) x (density of water at reference temperature used for specific gravity)

It’s fairly simple to understand what it’s about if we look at the individual terms:

  • (Brix at single strength / 100) – if our Brix value is effectively how many grams of soluble solids there are per 100g of product, then dividing this by 100 gives us the quantity of soluble solids per g of product. Multiplying this by the factory of 1000 then gives us the g of soluble solids per kg.
  • To turn this into a value per L we then need to multiply by the density, hence the inclusion of specific gravity, but that is a relative density so we then also need to include the conversion factor for water at the temperature reference point used.

For the specific gravity (SG) you’ll generally want to find this from a suitable reference table – a common option for this is the USDA’s Sucrose Conversion Tables (ref. 135-A-50), which is attached for reference.

Considering your specific question, we have a target “brix at single strength” of 14.0, and using the USDA table we can see that this corresponds to an SG of 1.05683.

Our reference density for water is 0.99715g/ml.

 

Putting these into the above formula we get:

Soluble solids required = 1000 x (14.0/100) x 1.05683 x 0.99715 = 147.5345g per L. This is effectively how much “stuff” we need in our finished juice / drink, so we can then move on to calculate how much of the concentrate base we need to achieve this.

 

Second stage:

Concentrate required (in grams) = (soluble solids required) x [100/(Brix of concentrate)]

Again we have a formula that makes sense if we look at the component terms.
The soluble solids required is the figure that we’ve just calculated above.

“Brix of concentrate” is the soluble solids per 100g in the concentrate/base we’re using, so if we multiply that by 10 we get the soluble solids per kg. What we actually need is grams, so we divide that by 1000, and thus get: 10 x (Brix of Concentrate) / 1000

Which simplifies down to: (Brix of Concentrate)/100

 

The formula above is therefore basically dividing the soluble solids figure we need, by the soluble solids per g in the concentrate, to calculate how many grams of concentrate are required.

Putting your figures into this we get:

Concentrate required = 147.5345 x (100/14.5) = 1017.4793g

To make 1L of product at 14.0 Brix you therefore need 1017.4793g of the 14.5 Brix product.

You can also calculate how much water you need, as you already have the figure for the SG as we looked it up for the first calculation. The density of the product is therefore 1.05683 x 0.99715 = 1.05382kg/L.

We know that we already have 1.0174793kg of material from the concentrate base, so the remainder (the "missing" figure is the difference) is the water component that we need to add.
Thus for 1000L of product you need:

1000 x 1.0174793 = 1017.4793kg of 14.5 Brix material

1000 x (1.05382 – 1.0174793) = 36.3kg water.

 

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