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Cleaning verification using E-Coli VS a Listeria check?

cleaning verification and san

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#1 KristinePlmr

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Posted 26 March 2020 - 01:02 PM

We have added an extra cleaning and sanitizing of the entire production line zones 1-3 if an employee is found to be at risk of the virus and confirms a test positive.

Normally, we verify cleaning by zone-2 swabbing for dry ATP. 

 

It was mentioned to use the E-coli for verification during the crisis. Can you clarify with respect to cleaning verification during the crisis- would Genus Listeria be acceptable in place of testing for E-coli for a cleaning verification to capture against a virus?

- We use Microsnap swabs and already have Listeria swabs in house with incubators. E-coli would be a different swab we'd need to purchase.

 

Also- immediately after the extra cleaning, prior to the sanitizing- is it still acceptable for verification using zone-2?

 


#2 Vladimir Surcinski

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 02:48 PM

Dear Kristine,

 

We have been lead by some of the laboratory people saying that if you make area or surface clean, this means that area or surface is not adequate for virus to be found there. 

Since virus is different from the bacteria, virus needs living cells to change their information like DNA or RNA, if you remove the living cells or bacteria, there is no area for virus to develop. 

 

This is the main reason behind, why we mentioned E. Coli. If you can prove that your cleaning process was successful enough to remove bacteria, than it must be that cleaning is also sufficient to have virus free area or surface. In this case it would mean also if you prove that Listeria is removed, this is sufficient to have virus free area or surface. Also i think that verification from zone-2 is sufficient.

 

Does this make sense to you? Do you have any other opinion, since we are not microbiology specialists and this is only some logical thinking based on conversation with laboratory people?



#3 Charles.C

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 04:58 PM

Dear Kristine,

 

We have been lead by some of the laboratory people saying that if you make area or surface clean, this means that area or surface is not adequate for virus to be found there. 

Since virus is different from the bacteria, virus needs living cells to change their information like DNA or RNA, if you remove the living cells or bacteria, there is no area for virus to develop. 

 

This is the main reason behind, why we mentioned E. Coli. If you can prove that your cleaning process was successful enough to remove bacteria, than it must be that cleaning is also sufficient to have virus free area or surface. In this case it would mean also if you prove that Listeria is removed, this is sufficient to have virus free area or surface. Also i think that verification from zone-2 is sufficient.

 

Does this make sense to you? Do you have any other opinion, since we are not microbiology specialists and this is only some logical thinking based on conversation with laboratory people?

 

Hi Vladimir,

 

I rather doubt that failure to detect (generic)E.coli or Listeria proves there is a total absence of bacteria. APC data might be informative.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 zanorias

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Posted 28 March 2020 - 05:37 PM

I'd keep with ATP, and tighten your parameters if anything to ensure that "extra" cleaning has been effective. Whilst viruses don't generate ATP themselves, it will be a clearer general indicator of cleanliness than a bacteria-specific test; an absence of E-coli would surely be expected as standard anyway without extra cleaning. ATP is

also an instant result - presumably your incubator is 48hr to confirm negative?






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