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Does anyone know how often raw milk tankers must be cleaned?

dairy raw milk sanitation

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#1 kkokoski

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Posted 19 May 2020 - 12:07 PM

Hi all, 

 

 Does anyone know how often raw milk tankers must be cleaned?  A facility is receiving tankers of raw milk coming from a farm in upstate NY to a local processor in western MA. I cannot seem to find anything.  Is there any standards similar to juice tankers and JPA?  Thanks in advance! 



#2 The Food Scientist

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Posted 19 May 2020 - 02:29 PM

I think you should carry out a risk assessment to determine how often it must be cleaned. 

 

Maybe this article can help you

 

https://www.scienced...311724?via=ihub

 

:)


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#3 Ryan M.

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Posted 19 May 2020 - 04:53 PM

The Pasteurized Milk Ordinance is your friend...a.k.a. "The PMO".  It outlines all requirements for dairies from raw milk out to shipping of milk.

 

FYI...there is a bit of gray area on milk tanker trucks.  IIRC, tankers must be washed after receiving if the tanker is not picking up milk from the same producer within a 24 hour period.  Application meaning, if a producer has multiple tankers of milk to off-load to a processor each day the same milk tanker truck can be used without washing so long as it does so within 24 hours.  This is atypical though, at least in my experience in California.  I'm sure it is quite different in your region with smaller milk producers and co-mingling from several producers on one tanker.  If you have several producers on one tanker you will need to wash the tanker after off-loading before it can be used to pump more milk onto.

 

Milk regulatory information from FDA.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...model-documents

 

E-copy of current PMO.  **2019 revision is due to be published sometime in May or June.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...114169/download

 

Almost forgot, check with your local dairy & food branch.  Sometimes, they have local regulations that surpass the PMO.  This happened quite a bit in California, but I think on a general level the other 49 states of the union mirrored what the PMO stated.


Edited by Ryan M., 19 May 2020 - 04:54 PM.


#4 pHruit

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 12:44 PM

This is UK rather than US so not sure how much use it is to you beyond being a general reference, but this (admittedly somewhat dated) guidance from industry body Dairy UK suggests once per 24 hours: http://www.dairytran...ly_2010__2_.pdf



#5 kkokoski

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Posted 20 May 2020 - 04:45 PM

Thanks, everyone!  This was more information for my cousin's dairy farm with processing plant.  They are receiving raw milk from another farm and was just curious.  I'll check out all of the suggestions!  







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