Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

USDA Regulation on how fast hot water has to be available?

hot water

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

rgiuliano137

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 77 posts
  • 3 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 18 February 2021 - 04:25 PM

USDA inspector is stating that when she enters the production hot water is not readily available to wash her hands, it takes up to 30 seconds for the hot water to be available in the cold processing room is there a regulation for USDA that states how fast hot water has to be available? Thank you

 

 



Scampi

    Fellow

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,752 posts
  • 1012 thanks
656
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 18 February 2021 - 04:33 PM

Food Code

5-202.12 Handwashing Lavatory, Water Temperature, and Flow.

  1. A handwashing lavatory shall be equipped to provide water at a temperature of at least 43°C (110°F) through a mixing valve or combination faucet.
  2. A steam mixing valve may not be used at a handwashing lavatory.
  3. A self-closing, slow-closing, or metering faucet shall provide a flow of water for at least 15 seconds without the need to reactivate the faucet.

No---inspectors will always state it should be immediate.....


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


SQFconsultant

    SQFconsultant

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,747 posts
  • 944 thanks
829
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:American Patriot
    WWG1WGA
    Never give up, never give in - always win!
    Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts

Posted 18 February 2021 - 04:34 PM

No it states hot/warm water to be readily available.

30 seconds is an excessive amount of timevto generate hot water and employees are not going to wait on it.

Considering that nost immediately place their hands under the running water and are done in seconds.

Most companies install instant warm/hot water boosters locatrd right near or under the sink.


Kind regards,
Glenn Oster
 
GOC BUSINESS GROUP | SQF System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants
Internal Auditor Training - eConsultant Retainer Subscriptions - Pre & Post SQF-GAP Audits - Consultant Training
Visit us @ http://www.GlennOster.com  or call us @ 772.646.4115 US-EST 8am-4pm Anyday except Thursday
 
 

rgiuliano137

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 77 posts
  • 3 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 18 February 2021 - 05:09 PM

Thank you everyone for the response, i looked up the Food Code and found this:

 

Issue Number: Council I 036

Title

Designation of Water Temperature at Handwashing Sinks as a Core Item

Issue you would like the Conference to consider

To designate Section 5-202.12 (A) of the 2009 FDA Food Code as a Core Item, thereby changing the designation of delivery of water at a temperature of at least 38oC (100oF) through a mixing valve or combination faucet from a Priority Foundation to a Core Item.

 

Public Health Significance

FDA Food Code Chapter 5 [Plumbing, Water and Waste] Section 5-202.12, Handwashing Sink, Installation, paragraph (A), recommends that, "A handwashing sink shall be equipped to provide water at a temperature of at least 38oC (100oF) through a mixing valve or combination faucet..." This provision is currently designated as a Priority Foundation Item even though the temperature is specific to plumbing equipment and is not included in the handwashing procedures in section 2-301.12.

 

Hand-washing is an important food safety practice and specific procedures for hand washing are included in the Food Code in Section 2-301.12. The mechanical action of washing one's hands, use of soap, length of time hands are washed, rinsing, hand drying and proper hand-wash training have all been noted as important factors in accomplishing proper hand washing. More specifically, paragraph 2-301.12 (B) recommends that "warm water" be used for hand washing and rinsing, without a specific water temperature. Therefore the water temperature alone will not contribute directly to the elimination, prevention or reduction to an acceptable level, hazard associated with foodborne illness as specified in priority item definition.

 

Sighting a specific threshold water temperature does not predicate successful hand-washing, which can be accomplished at various water temperatures. This is supported by the work of Michaels et al (2002, see attached) which concluded that there was no statistical difference in log reductions for both resident and transient bacteria during handwashing based on water temperature (see attachment). The results reported by Michaels confirm the observations made by Price (Price 1938) and Larson (Larson et al. 1980) indicating water temperature has little or no effect on the removal of bacteria from hands.

 

In summary, specific procedures such as handwashing frequency, length and technique have been shown to have a direct impact on the risk factors that contribute to foodborne illness, and therefore are aligned with the definition of a priority foundation item.

 

However, the temperature of water delivered at a handwashing sink does not directly contribute to the elimination, prevention or reduction (to acceptable levels) of the hazards associated with foodborne illness. The temperature of the water is more consistent with the definition of a Core Item, which relates to general sanitation, operational controls, sanitation standard operating procedures (SSOP), facilities or structures, equipment design, or general maintenance. The plumbing recommendations listed in section 5-202.12 are consistent with the definition of a core item.

 

 

Issue View | Council I | 2012 Scribe Packet

» CFP | Opening Page | Council I Issue Listing

The Issue that you selected is shown below. If you click on "Word Document File with Tracking," you will open a Word document version of the Issue. Because the document you will be opening is in Word format, you will need to use Word functions to save or print the Issue. When you view or use this Word version, the internal html functions will no longer work. Closing the screen will return you to the Start icon.

Issue Number: Council I 036 Title
Designation of Water Temperature at Handwashing Sinks as a Core Item
Issue you would like the Conference to consider

To designate Section 5-202.12 (A) of the 2009 FDA Food Code as a Core Item, thereby changing the designation of delivery of water at a temperature of at least 38oC (100oF) through a mixing valve or combination faucet from a Priority Foundation to a Core Item.

Public Health Significance

FDA Food Code Chapter 5 [Plumbing, Water and Waste] Section 5-202.12, Handwashing Sink, Installation, paragraph (A), recommends that, "A handwashing sink shall be equipped to provide water at a temperature of at least 38oC (100oF) through a mixing valve or combination faucet..." This provision is currently designated as a Priority Foundation Item even though the temperature is specific to plumbing equipment and is not included in the handwashing procedures in section 2-301.12.

Hand-washing is an important food safety practice and specific procedures for hand washing are included in the Food Code in Section 2-301.12. The mechanical action of washing one's hands, use of soap, length of time hands are washed, rinsing, hand drying and proper hand-wash training have all been noted as important factors in accomplishing proper hand washing. More specifically, paragraph 2-301.12 (B) recommends that "warm water" be used for hand washing and rinsing, without a specific water temperature. Therefore the water temperature alone will not contribute directly to the elimination, prevention or reduction to an acceptable level, hazard associated with foodborne illness as specified in priority item definition.

Sighting a specific threshold water temperature does not predicate successful hand-washing, which can be accomplished at various water temperatures. This is supported by the work of Michaels et al (2002, see attached) which concluded that there was no statistical difference in log reductions for both resident and transient bacteria during handwashing based on water temperature (see attachment). The results reported by Michaels confirm the observations made by Price (Price 1938) and Larson (Larson et al. 1980) indicating water temperature has little or no effect on the removal of bacteria from hands.

In summary, specific procedures such as handwashing frequency, length and technique have been shown to have a direct impact on the risk factors that contribute to foodborne illness, and therefore are aligned with the definition of a priority foundation item.

However, the temperature of water delivered at a handwashing sink does not directly contribute to the elimination, prevention or reduction (to acceptable levels) of the hazards associated with foodborne illness. The temperature of the water is more consistent with the definition of a Core Item, which relates to general sanitation, operational controls, sanitation standard operating procedures (SSOP), facilities or structures, equipment design, or general maintenance. The plumbing recommendations listed in section 5-202.12 are consistent with the definition of a core item.



rgiuliano137

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 77 posts
  • 3 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 18 February 2021 - 05:37 PM

FROM USDA POLICY:

 

askfsis-msg-template.jpg

Recently you requested personal assistance from our on-line support center. Below is a summary of your request and our response.

If this issue is not resolved to your satisfaction, you may reopen it within the next 14 days.

Thank you for allowing us to be of service to you.

To update this question by email, please reply to this message or to access your question from our support site, click here.

Subject

hot water for hand washing

Response By Email (RE@askFSIS) (02/18/2021 12:13 PM)

Hi Roberto

 

Thank you for your question to askFSIS.

 

There is really no specific temperature requirement for hot water or cold water or a time frame for how long it should take to reach maximum temperature.

 

*[The Agency does not have a specific regulation for a hot water temperature requirement with the exception of 9 CFR 381.36©(1)(viii) and 9 CFR 311.16(b) (in this particular case it may be possible to use a chemical sanitizer instead of the water sanitizer).] 

 

9 CFR 416.2(g)(1) only requires a supply of running water that complies with the National Primary Drinking Water regulations (40 CFR part 141) at a suitable temperature and under pressure as needed, must be provided in all areas where required (for processing product, for cleaning rooms, equipment, utensils, and packaging materials). 

 

On the other hand, 9 CFR 416.2(h)(2) addresses lavatories (i.e., restrooms) with running hot and cold water, soap, and towels, must be placed in or near toilet and urinal rooms and at such other places in the establishment as necessary to ensure cleanliness of all persons handling any product. This regulation requires hot and cold running water as necessary to ensure the cleanliness of all persons handling product. Note that there is not a specific requirement for the temperature of hot or cold water, but the intent of the regulation is that the lavatories have water temperature sufficient to ensure employees can effectively clean their hands and maintain sanitary conditions.

 

  • Hot water (and the temperature of) supplied for handwashing should be adequate for cleaning hands. Also, it should be at a temperature that does not scald the hands. Based on guidelines from the FDA Food Code, temperatures of 100°F are mentioned as adequate. While this FDA guideline cannot be viewed as a FSIS regulatory requirement, it could represent a best-case scenario.

 

In summary, there really is no specific water temperature requirement for hand washing or cleaning of equipment/utensils in a slaughter or processing facility with the exception of 9 CFR 381.36©(1)(viii) and 9 CFR 311.16(b). Ultimately, it may be up to the judgment of the IIC or frontline supervisor. Keep in mind the establishment also has the right, under 9 CFR 306.5, 9 CFR 381.35 and 9 CFR 590.310, to appeal any inspection decision that it feels is not supported. Information addressing the appeal process can be found that the following link: https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/fb80c1b0-4e21-4db3-9003-93405f780c98/Appealing-Inspection-Decisions.pdf?MOD=AJPERES.

 

I hope this information is helpful. Should you have additional questions regarding this issue, feel free to update this incident to provide any information you feel is relevant to the subject and we will be glad to provide an updated response.

 

askFSIS and Small Plant Help Desk are Moving to a New Platform

 

On February 19th, 2021 askFSIS and the Small Plant Help Desk will be transferred to a new data management platform. This change will result in some improvements. For example, in the new system, customers can simply submit their question directly from the web interface without the need to create an account or login. This change will also seamlessly connect askFSIS and the Small Plant Help Desk to Ask USDA and help further improve customer service. Existing customers will have until February 18th to save any of their submitted questions. You can find instructions for saving your questions on the askFSIS and Small Plant Help Desk account page.

 

Auto-Response By (Administrator) (02/18/2021 11:05 AM)

askFSIS and Small Plant Help Desk are Moving to a New Platform

 

On February 19th, 2021 askFSIS and the Small Plant Help Desk will be transferred to a new data management platform. This change will result in some improvements. For example, in the new system, customers can simply submit their question directly from the web interface without the need to create an account or login. This change will also seamlessly connect askFSIS and the Small Plant Help Desk to Ask USDA and help further improve customer service. Existing customers will have until February 18th to save any of their submitted questions. You can find instructions for saving your questions on the askFSIS and Small Plant Help Desk account page.

 

Your message has been received by the Policy Development Staff (PDS) and will be assigned to a staff specialist for response.

 

Our goal is to provide an accurate response as quickly as possible—in most instances, this will be within two working days. Some questions, however, require extensive research and will take longer to answer. If you would like to know the status of your question, you can telephone PDS for additional discussion at 1-800-233-3935 between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. CT, Monday through Friday. Please refer to the incident reference number below when calling for clarification.

 

The reference number for your question is 210218-000025

You may update your incident here.

 

Thank you.

 Policy Development Staff

 

Customer By CSS Web (Erika Villalobos) (02/18/2021 11:05 AM)

our iic is requiring that hot water become available instantly, we have a cold room and it takes a few minutes for hot water to be available.what is the regulation on hot water?

 
 
 

AvNk9QrcDv8S~SrbGl8e~yLrEP0q0y75Mv8t~zj~



Thanked by 1 Member:

Scampi

    Fellow

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,752 posts
  • 1012 thanks
656
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 18 February 2021 - 05:43 PM

The warm water is to promote handwashing........no one wants to wash their hands in cold and they certainly won't do it properly in cold

 

Pick you battles.......CFIA has tried the same thing and the reg is pretty much the same


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


Ryan M.

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,250 posts
  • 449 thanks
251
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, AL
  • Interests:Reading, crosswords, passionate discussions, laughing at US politics.

Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:31 AM

Hot, warm, cold is all relative.  At the end of the day you need to make sure employees are effectively washing their hands.

 

Next time an inspector or auditor makes a claim politely ask them to point you to the relevant section of the regulation or code.  This usually helps with these matters.

 

Since you are in the US you need to mindful of TOO hot with hand washing.  OSHA has a standard in their regulation which I believe is 108oF if I recall correctly.

 

California Health Code states the following:

 

© Handwashing facilities shall be equipped to provide warm water
under pressure for a minimum of 15 seconds through a mixing valve or
combination faucet. If the temperature of water provided to a
handwashing sink is not readily adjustable at the faucet, the
temperature of the water shall be at least 100 F, but not greater
than 108 F.

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...o-be-available/







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users