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Can anyone suggest a good repair for cracks in a blast freezer cement floor?


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#1 Willis Morgan

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 07:22 PM

Hi I am getting ready for another audit but since our last audit the cement flooring in our blast freezer has had some cracks form. Does any one know or could suggest a good repair or epoxy coating for this? Thanks, Willis



#2 Scampi

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 07:52 PM

are you able to empty it and let it warm up and have the time for the  repair to properly cure?


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#3 SQFconsultant

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 07:57 PM

https://www.garonpro...g-epoxy-mortar/


Kind regards,
Glenn Oster
 
GOC BUSINESS GROUP | SQF System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants
 

 

Serving the New Republic of the United States of America, Costa Rica, Panama & Caribbean Islands

 

 


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#4 Ryan M.

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 07:58 PM

If cracks are small enough you can use floor crack repair.  There are some options out there that even set and cure in freezer conditions.  You may want to get some input from a company who specializes in floor repairs, floor coatings.



#5 Willis Morgan

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 09:28 PM

Thanks Glenn, this looks like exactly what i need and should work for our freezer.



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 10:46 PM

IMEX this is an expert job and involves (a) shutting down, (b) digging up the floor, © filling with low temperature compatible cement  and (d) several days to fully set.

 

Regardless, Good Luck with the magic epoxy !


Edited by Charles.C, 20 April 2021 - 11:10 PM.
added

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 Ryan M.

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 04:58 PM

Not all cases Charles.  It depends on the size of the crack and overall floor condition.  I've had a lot of success with epoxy patching in freezers and coolers.  The biggest mistakes people make are selecting the incorrect product, and not allowing it sufficient time to cure since at colder temperatures it takes longer to cure to allow full traffic.

 

What Glenn posted is the right material for the application.  It allows setting as long as 10 below F.

 

IMEX this is an expert job and involves (a) shutting down, (b) digging up the floor, © filling with low temperature compatible cement  and (d) several days to fully set.

 

Regardless, Good Luck with the magic epoxy !


Edited by Ryan M., 21 April 2021 - 04:59 PM.


#8 Charles.C

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 05:28 PM

Not all cases Charles.  It depends on the size of the crack and overall floor condition.  I've had a lot of success with epoxy patching in freezers and coolers.  The biggest mistakes people make are selecting the incorrect product, and not allowing it sufficient time to cure since at colder temperatures it takes longer to cure to allow full traffic.

 

What Glenn posted is the right material for the application.  It allows setting as long as 10 below F.

Hi Ryan,

 

Yes, totally agree. Every case is special. Also may relate to what the business is.

The "expert" we engaged warned us that quite often the full problem is not easily visible from external observation but penetrates deeper such that in a short while a limited surface treatment will fail at the freezing temperatures  involved (air temp. can be down to -30degC).


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#9 paulam1

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 05:41 PM

https://www.tufcoflooring.com/

#10 Charles.C

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 05:53 PM

 

Thanks but epoxy data sheet States 0-200 deg F


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#11 paulam1

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 07:09 PM

Look here:

https://www.tufcoflo...ialty-products/

They have other specialty products to assist with specifically blast freezers. I have them in our plant, and they are wonderful!



#12 Ryan M.

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 08:12 PM

Yes, correct.  If there has been or is water intrusion then it needs further evaluation.  For floors that are older and have been through more traffic this is more problematic to be certain.  However, if flooring is newer, recently refinished, or traffic is not as heavy then the surface issues are more than likely just surface issues.  The real bugger though is water so if there is evidence of water damage or water intrusion that's definitely the time to bring in experts to further evaluate.

 

Hi Ryan,

 

Yes, totally agree. Every case is special. Also may relate to what the business is.

The "expert" we engaged warned us that quite often the full problem is not easily visible from external observation but penetrates deeper such that in a short while a limited surface treatment will fail at the freezing temperatures  involved (air temp. can be down to -30degC).



#13 Charles.C

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Posted 22 April 2021 - 12:23 AM

Look here:

https://www.tufcoflo...ialty-products/

They have other specialty products to assist with specifically blast freezers. I have them in our plant, and they are wonderful!

 

Thanks again but I do not see any mention of specific products suitable for (very) low temperature applications.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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