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A Step By Step Guide To Implementing Iso 22000


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Goliath

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 11:09 AM

Hi there good fellows, I have been advised on another thread not to buy the guidance for iso 22000 as it will disappoint. For now I have placed 22k near the bottom of my intray until after xmas. What would be great to have on my return in 2007 would be some sort of plan to motivate me to get started. What I'm after is some sort of step by step guide to implementing ISO 22000, is this available anywhere? I'm not looking for a detailed prescription more like ABC - 123, for example a. buy the standard, b. read it, c...............................z. get regsitered to ISO 22000. :thumbup:

Tks,
David



jamesgibb

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 12:58 PM

Hi there good fellows, I have been advised on another thread not to buy the guidance for iso 22000 as it will disappoint. For now I have placed 22k near the bottom of my intray until after xmas. What would be great to have on my return in 2007 would be some sort of plan to motivate me to get started. What I'm after is some sort of step by step guide to implementing ISO 22000, is this available anywhere? I'm not looking for a detailed prescription more like ABC - 123, for example a. buy the standard, b. read it, c...............................z. get regsitered to ISO 22000. :thumbup:

Tks,
David



David,

here is a basic outline that I send out by e mail to potential clients when they ask about ISO22000.

Within ISO22000 the company must carry out the following activities in the sequence below:

1. Appoint a food safety team
2. Establish what Pre-Requisite Programmes (PRPs) they already have in place. (employee health checks, cleaning of surfaces, laundry of workwear, hairnets)
3. These PRPs should then have the activities to be controlled documents (establish work instructions/procedures/control forms)
4. Once they have established these they should then develop specifications for all raw materials (including water, packaging and equipment) - These should reference to the national standards where appropriate (EG: Salads, Ketchup, Meat, Poultry)
5. Then establish specifications for all end products (dishes) - Including the expected uses of the products
6. For each production line/process they should produce a flow chart showing all inputs and outputs.(including wastes)
7. Using the information above the company should then identify all potential food safety hazards (Chemical, Physical and Biological) for each process/production line/end product.
8. They will now have a list of all the potential hazards they think they could have.
9. Each hazard should be considered to see the level of risk (EG1: Hazard = Microbiology in cooked rice, the current controls mean the rice is left in the microwave for 12 hours and heated when needed. - This has a high risk. EG2: Hazard = Physical contamination by hair in product, the current controls are for all employees to wear hairnets and arm covers - this is a lower risk. The methodology they use needs to be clear and repeatable.
10. They need to establish what level of risk is acceptable.
11. Once they know the level of acceptable risk they must address all hazards which are over that level.
12. This can be done by either Operational Pre-Requisite Programmes (oPRPs) OR by establishing a HACCP Plan.**
13. They must select the control measures to address the hazard using a defined methodology (normally the Codex decision tree) - this decision methodology must be repeatable and the record available to show it was followed.
14. Then they must Validate the control measures to confirm they will reduce the hazards to below the acceptable level (like SPC in automotive engineering)
15. Once the validation confirms that the hazard will be reduced effectively they need to document and implement the control measures
16. Once implemented these need to be verified periodically.


**An oPRP is where there is no defined critical limit OR where there is a CCP further along the Production line. EG: a sausage maker has 3 metal detection devices in the production line. The first 2 devices would be controlled by an oPRP because the third device is the 'critical' control


Hope this helps! :smarty:

"arguing with an auditor is like wrestling with a pig in mud, eventually you realise that the pig enjoys it"

cazyncymru

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 02:01 PM

Attached File  ISO_22000_QG.pdf   1015.05KB   413 downloads


Not sure if this is any good to you, but happy to share :whistle:

Caz x


Simon

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 09:09 PM

Thanks for helping out guys - you're great. :clap:

Regards,
Simon


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Goliath

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 02:03 PM

Yes thank you so much James & Caz, I can take something from both of your replies. Food for thought I 'll chew over with the Turkey. See you all in the New Year, no doubt with dozens of questions. :unsure:

Tks,
David



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Posted 05 December 2006 - 04:54 PM

Hi there good fellows, I have been advised on another thread not to buy the guidance for iso 22000 as it will disappoint. For now I have placed 22k near the bottom of my intray until after xmas. What would be great to have on my return in 2007 would be some sort of plan to motivate me to get started. What I'm after is some sort of step by step guide to implementing ISO 22000, is this available anywhere? I'm not looking for a detailed prescription more like ABC - 123, for example a. buy the standard, b. read it, c...............................z. get regsitered to ISO 22000. :thumbup:

Tks,
David


David,
Like all ISO management systems standards, each implementation is unique to the specific organisation. As a result, and sadly, the can never be a one-size-fits-all solution or a road map or an A-Z sequence with Z=put the certificate on the wall. However, somewhere near the top should be a gap analysis, which should be an objective review of where your existing sytems already meet the requirements of the standard. The gaps are where you need to invest your time.
Disappointment with ISO standards invariably arises from situations where users want total guidance, not an empty vessel for you to fill. I happen to believe good standards (like the ISO FSMS) do not impose on users, they empower them.
Hope this helps a little.
Roderick


Charles.C

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 05:49 PM

Dear Roderick,

Nice to see your first post.
It's a bit off-topic but ---
Not wishing too be too harsh towards the ISO people since I do admire their continuing efforts but my own personal disappointment with many of the standards has been that they are frequently unintelligible but in a peculiarly unique way.

Kind Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Simon

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 08:13 PM

David,
Like all ISO management systems standards, each implementation is unique to the specific organisation. As a result, and sadly, the can never be a one-size-fits-all solution or a road map or an A-Z sequence with Z=put the certificate on the wall. However, somewhere near the top should be a gap analysis, which should be an objective review of where your existing sytems already meet the requirements of the standard. The gaps are where you need to invest your time.
Disappointment with ISO standards invariably arises from situations where users want total guidance, not an empty vessel for you to fill. I happen to believe good standards (like the ISO FSMS) do not impose on users, they empower them.
Hope this helps a little.
Roderick


With respect Roderick, I don't believe David was fishing for an A-Z on how to meet the requirements of ISO 22000; more the sequence of actions or a project roadmap. I agree after buying the map, and getting the car loaded with the family and picnic basket; a gap analysis is probably one of the very first turns.

Welcome to the forums Roderick, thanks for your input. :biggrin:

Regards,
Simon

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mkratz23

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 04:37 PM

Hi there good fellows, I have been advised on another thread not to buy the guidance for iso 22000 as it will disappoint. For now I have placed 22k near the bottom of my intray until after xmas. What would be great to have on my return in 2007 would be some sort of plan to motivate me to get started. What I'm after is some sort of step by step guide to implementing ISO 22000, is this available anywhere? I'm not looking for a detailed prescription more like ABC - 123, for example a. buy the standard, b. read it, c...............................z. get regsitered to ISO 22000. :thumbup:

Tks,
David


Who would advise you not to buy the guidance to ISO 22000? I am currently working with Kellogg, Kraft, ConAgra and several others to name a few that are looking forward to its growth. I can also offer assistance with your step by step guidance if you'd like.

Michael D. Kratz
ADM/Food Safety Specialist
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roderickmch

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 04:37 PM

Dear Roderick,

Nice to see your first post.
It's a bit off-topic but ---
Not wishing too be too harsh towards the ISO people since I do admire their continuing efforts but my own personal disappointment with many of the standards has been that they are frequently unintelligible but in a peculiarly unique way.

Kind Rgds / Charles.C


Thank you to Charles and Simon for their welcome. I am sure I will gain insights into this important topic, which is after all about food safety, not standards, and therefore important to all of us.

However, I do agree that something seems to happen in the ISO technical committees that makes their output not "user friendly".

Thanks again for the encouragement to contribute.
Roderick


Simon

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 11:22 AM

Who would advise you not to buy the guidance to ISO 22000? I am currently working with Kellogg, Kraft, ConAgra and several others to name a few that are looking forward to its growth. I can also offer assistance with your step by step guidance if you'd like.

Other members advised David not to buy the guidance - here

Feel free to post your ideas on step by step guidance for the benefit of all members. :biggrin:

Regards,
Simon

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