Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Pest control


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 27 August 2007 - 03:30 PM

:helpplease:
Since actual method for rodents control isn't efficient enough (baits inside cylinders) I'd like to hear about pros and cons of using 1/2 poisoned oranges closed inside traps (rats and mice love them).

Does anybody use a different method?



Premises are in the country and source of animals is enormous



Thank you in advance



Angelica


Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,528 posts
  • 1318 thanks
720
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 27 August 2007 - 08:18 PM

:helpplease:
Since actual method for rodents control isn't efficient enough (baits inside cylinders) I'd like to hear about pros and cons of using 1/2 poisoned oranges closed inside traps (rats and mice love them).

Does anybody use a different method?

Premises are in the country and source of animals is enormous

Hello Angelica. I'm no pest control expert, but for what it's worth I do have an opinion. If the rats and mice love the rotting oranges so much would using them not just encourage all the rodents from miles around? I’m presuming the little pests have a good sense of smell. Sure you want to catch them when they come, but I don’t think you should invite them over for a party. Just my uneducated opinion. :unsure:

Regards,
Simon

hand-pointing-down.gif
 
Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 140 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

recommend-us-on-facebook.png


angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:03 AM

You are very right Simon, that's why I'm looking for a different method.
Oranges have the water they need, and that's the reason they take them, even if poisoned. Rats don’t take dry baits because they prefer our product. And I suspect they are cleverer than we are because always find the way to reach it (I mean our product, despite the barriers we put). :(

thank you for your opinion



Suzuki

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 76 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malaysia

Posted 28 August 2007 - 07:11 AM

Hi Angelica

We have removed all our pest contractors and perform in-house pest control management using ONLY non-poisonous baits and we still prefer the old rat trap cages.

I suppose if the poisoned oranges are effective baits, these should be used in rat cages and should be your first line of defence and placed along external parameters of your premise. (none in the internal production area). This way, the bait-taken rats do not get into your factory areas and you ensure cross contamination of chemical poisoning does not occur.

The trick really is to wash you rat cages in hot water to get rid of the odor they release after they are caught.

Hope this helps

Suzuki



angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 28 August 2007 - 09:39 AM

The trick really is to wash you rat cages in hot water to get rid of the odor they release after they are caught.

Hope this helps

Suzuki


great trick ! :clap: never heard about it!

thank you Suzuki!

angelica


cazyncymru

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • Banned
  • 1,604 posts
  • 340 thanks
126
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 August 2007 - 04:49 PM

great trick ! :clap: never heard about it!

thank you Suzuki!

angelica



I can remember, when i first started out in the dairy industry, that each dairy had a Cat!!

:thumbup:


Sankara narayanan

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 159 posts
  • 1 thanks
1
Neutral

  • India
    India
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UAE

Posted 29 August 2007 - 09:16 AM

Dear Angelica,
Why don't you try electronic pest repellars? We have installed several of them in critical areas of operation and found them to be quite effective.

Best Regards,

A Sankara Narayanan


A.Sankara Narayanan

Suzuki

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 76 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malaysia

Posted 29 August 2007 - 03:13 PM

Hi Sankara,

Pest repellar is an interesting idea. But when there is no catch there is no verification analysis and when there is no data implementation, you loose the measurable objective concept. And, then we have the validation part to be concern about!

Repellent approach does not eliminate or reduce but probably prevent but sure hope you can provide the proof. I wonder how the auditor would view this approach to pest management.

Regards
Suzuki



angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 29 August 2007 - 06:50 PM

Dear Angelica,
Why don't you try electronic pest repellars? We have installed several of them in critical areas of operation and found them to be quite effective.

Best Regards,

A Sankara Narayanan


Hello Sankara

I used that kind of devices at home, since I used to live close to a barn. Then I heard electronic (ultrasound) affects human beings, so I stop using them at home. Fortunately I moved and don't need anything like pest control at home :biggrin:


but I’m very precautious to use them in the premises. :dunno:

Have you ever heard anything like that?

I'm going to ask our "occupational safety and health" people ...



angelica


angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 30 August 2007 - 12:40 AM

I can remember, when i first started out in the dairy industry, that each dairy had a Cat!!

:thumbup:


good old times!! (from a cat's point of view I mean) :biggrin:


moo73steve

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 18 posts
  • 6 thanks
0
Neutral
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brisbane, Australia

Posted 31 August 2007 - 04:59 AM

An alternative to the common bait station is to use a liquid bait station. This would provide the water they are after rather than the normal bait.
I think most commercial pest controller should have access to them.



Suzuki

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 76 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malaysia

Posted 31 August 2007 - 05:47 AM

Steve

Its an excellent idea. I would use it.

Regards
Suzuki



angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 31 August 2007 - 07:27 PM

An alternative to the common bait station is to use a liquid bait station. This would provide the water they are after rather than the normal bait.
I think most commercial pest controller should have access to them.


our pest control guys don't have liquid bait station, because they can't afford the cost of devices that prevent spill. That's why they put half oranges.


Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,528 posts
  • 1318 thanks
720
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 01 September 2007 - 08:04 AM

our pest control guys don't have liquid bait station, because they can't afford the cost of devices that prevent spill. That's why they put half oranges.

So are you going to argue the case of food safety over cost Angelica?

hand-pointing-down.gif
 
Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 140 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

recommend-us-on-facebook.png


angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 01 September 2007 - 02:58 PM

So are you going to argue the case of food safety over cost Angelica?



Hi Simon



Remember I asked for pros and cons of half oranges method in my first post?



Well, I’m still looking for different methods. Effective methods, of course. Then, we need to meet with pest control contractors and discuss the alternatives.



No final word is already said.



Does it answer your question? If not I’m sorry, I’m afraid I don’t get the real meaning of it and I need to ask you please, could you clarify it for me?



Ps: I appreciate very much your opinions, thank you :smile:


Bunny

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 32 posts
  • 13 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Guildford, Surrey
  • Interests:Good Food, Wine, Beer and other Spirits and of course Pest Control in the food industry.

Posted 11 September 2007 - 09:58 PM

As I understand it you are looking for the pro`s and con`s of the half orange approach.

Pro`s from a pest control view point, it makes sense to use and poison baits that are most attractive to the target species, are your costs so poor that you cannot afford to use liquid bait dispensers?

Cons: I`m sure that if you are looking to export your product are there sufficient safeguards that the poisoned product cannot enter production?

In this ever expanding market and shrinking world I would be suprised if some of the markets you are hoping to supply would accept your proposal for using the same foodstuffs for baiting rodents as are processed in plant.

There would appear to be an unacceptable risk of contamination.

Just a viewpoint from a food industry pestie in the UK, the restrictions in this neck of the woods are obviously much more stringent than in your area.

Regard

Bunny :thumbup:


"If you think it is expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."
Red Adair, American Oil Well Firefighter.

hacked

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 20 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Philippines
    Philippines
  • Location:Manila, Philipppines

Posted 16 September 2007 - 07:01 AM

just a quick question: won't the poisoned orange attract pests other than rodents?


assimilating the world

angelica

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 30 posts
  • 2 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Argentina
    Argentina
  • Gender:Female

Posted 16 September 2007 - 02:10 PM

just a quick question: won't the poisoned orange attract pests other than rodents?


well, it seems to be one of the cons


thank you Hacked :bye:


mattiesheldon

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 1 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Australia
    Australia

Posted 19 March 2008 - 03:04 AM

Apart from the fact that I love oranges and would hate to see them being put to use as pest control bait, I think this sounds like a very cost efficient idea. Like the others have mentioned, I would be worried that it would attract all sorts of pests but I suppose getting rid of as many pests as you can would be fine.

Do you have an update on what you decided to do?


Edited by mattiesheldon, 19 March 2008 - 03:04 AM.


Penard

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 171 posts
  • 3 thanks
2
Neutral

  • France
    France
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:France
  • Interests:Literature : novels, Sci-Fi, thrillers; Rowing; Personal and Professional travels

Posted 19 March 2008 - 11:20 AM

Angelica,

Good question from mattie; a few months later, what is your opinion about all those pest propositions?

Regards,

Emmanuel.



Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,528 posts
  • 1318 thanks
720
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 26 March 2008 - 08:44 PM

Apart from the fact that I love oranges and would hate to see them being put to use as pest control bait, I think this sounds like a very cost efficient idea. Like the others have mentioned, I would be worried that it would attract all sorts of pests but I suppose getting rid of as many pests as you can would be fine.

Do you have an update on what you decided to do?



Angelica,

Good question from mattie; a few months later, what is your opinion about all those pest propositions?

Regards,

Emmanuel.

Angelica are you there?

hand-pointing-down.gif
 
Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 140 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

recommend-us-on-facebook.png


EuGeNe

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 57 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Malaysia
    Malaysia

Posted 27 March 2008 - 02:34 AM

Just like Suzuki said, you could use poisoned oranges but keep it at the third line defense; which is the external perimeter of your premis only.

For use in internal processing areas (first line def), the pest control experts suggested to use non-poisonous glue boards only. It is technically just a box with holes and sticky pad that will capture the rodent when they accidentally enters this box. This method is definitely not very effective since it depends on chance. However, it is also the safest and it does not attract rodents from other sources, what more about other types of pest.

For my third line defense, we use on dried salted fish instead of the oranges. The smell of this fish are simply irresistable...



cazyncymru

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • Banned
  • 1,604 posts
  • 340 thanks
126
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 March 2008 - 05:06 PM

Just like Suzuki said, you could use poisoned oranges but keep it at the third line defense; which is the external perimeter of your premis only.

For use in internal processing areas (first line def), the pest control experts suggested to use non-poisonous glue boards only. It is technically just a box with holes and sticky pad that will capture the rodent when they accidentally enters this box. This method is definitely not very effective since it depends on chance. However, it is also the safest and it does not attract rodents from other sources, what more about other types of pest.

For my third line defense, we use on dried salted fish instead of the oranges. The smell of this fish are simply irresistable...



Unfortunately for those of us who have BRC, homemade traps aren't really an option!


vin

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 16 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United Arab Emirates
    United Arab Emirates
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United Arab Emirates
  • Interests:Eating food, Exercise, cricket and ofcourse MUSIC

Posted 09 June 2008 - 12:11 AM

hai,
if u r going behind eradiation methods, never ends. because survivors will be there or pests may come from other regions also. my opinion is environetal control method. because through environmental control methods u r not only preventing rodents.

find the resons why rodents are there and find the solution also.



wijit

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 31 posts
  • 5 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 16 June 2008 - 04:58 PM

Very late on in this discussion, but for what it's worth;
If Angelica (still there?) uses Oranges then as already mentioned there is a strong risk of introducing and encouraging other pests which may be even harder to get rid of. The obvious possibility of having rotten food around would also not help with any audits she may encounter. What may be worthwhile is placing a Salt/Poison mixture out, this would have a much reduced odour than Oranges and so would concentrate on the existing rodent population if used wisely along known Rat runs. You could use this concurrently with traditional Rat baits.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users