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Raw Materials Control in BRC/IOP

BRC/IOP

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qualitymanager

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 01:19 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I m working in a company who produces ends for cans. I would like to know if, according to BRC/IOP, we should contol the inks and the streech film at the reception? in the standard it is required to control all raw materials but i don't know if streech film and inks are considered as a raw materials also

 

 

Thank you for your help



Charles.C

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 04:49 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I m working in a company who produces ends for cans. I would like to know if, according to BRC/IOP, we should contol the inks and the streech film at the reception? in the standard it is required to control all raw materials but i don't know if streech film and inks are considered as a raw materials also

 

 

Thank you for your help

 

Hi qm,

 

I'm not a Packaging person but i guess streech = stretch ?

 

It might help if you specified the relevant clause(s) in Standard.

 

Assuming you are referring to the hazard analysis portion of the Standard, I would anticipate this requires risk evaluation (and appropriate control) of all inputs relevant to the manufacturing process for the specific finished product.

 

No doubt packaging people here will shortly correct me if otherwise. :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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qualitymanager

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 05:15 PM

yes i meant stretch.

 

I m talking about the clause 5.8.1 which requires that all raw materials should be controled. My question is: the inks used in the printing process of the cans is considered as a raw material? and what about the strech film ?



Charles.C

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 05:32 PM

Hi qm,

 

Thks for the clarification. I can see that the BRC glossary definition of "raw material" is somewhat ambiguous.

 

5.8.1 - The site shall document a raw materials and intermediate product intake procedure to ensure that incoming goods match purchase or product specifications. This may take the form of:
•  purchase orders
•  delivery notes

Glosary

Raw material Any base material or semi-finished material used by the organisation for the manufacture of a product.

 

An answer may take a day or so since this is the weekend + holiday period for some lucky people  :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Thomas Athoo

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 04:26 AM

Yes you need to control. There are hazard associated with Ink and you know that Ink depending on the dye used is a chemical hazard and can contaminate food. you can require that the ink manufacture gives a proof that it is food grade



foodeng

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 11:14 AM

Dear qualitymanager,

 

The strech film is control points are

- dimensions,

- outer package conditions (no tears, smash, damage, holes, streched with bubbled wrap)

- regularly enrolled on a cardboard roller,

- inside film surface must be sticky, must not be torn at high tension in the machine

 

Inks are approved with its declaration of compliance, analyses report or first control in manufacturing area.

 

Best Regards



Charles.C

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 05:05 PM

Hi foodeng,

Thks for yr input.

Are you saying that yr answer to the OP with respect to the BRC Clause 5.8.1 is Yes ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


foodeng

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Posted 20 December 2016 - 07:44 AM

Dear Charles,

 

The answer is yes. Let me show you how to seperate the raw material intake approval in can making process:

 

- printing ink, thinner accepted with dec. of compiance, analyses certificate and after first check

- cardboard box, stretch film, tape, pallet, offset film accepted with first control and after quality control results

- metal sheets, lacquering cylinders, lacquer, blanket are first temporarily approved then permamently accepted after checking at production lines.

 

Kind Regards



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Foodworker

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 09:12 AM

You are probably making this more complicated than it needs to be.

 

This section of the Standard relates to incoming raw materials and ensuring that they are correct according to order and specification and will not cause contamination.

 

Raw materials for can ends are essentially the metal, lacquer, wax, inks,sealing compound and packaging materials..

 

The grade and specifications should have previously been designed and agreed between your development department and supplier, so at intake what you are looking for is that it is the correct material and to the correct specification.

 

Inks particularly are unlikely to show any problems until you try to use them on the line without carrying out extensive unrealistic analytical work

 

With most of these materials, there is very little that you can practically do at intake to ensure that they meet the specification and you are reliant upon your supplier assurance programme. 

 

At intake you are limited to checking the labels, batch coding (including shelf life if appropriate) and the physical condition - damage, infestation etc.

 

You may have agreed with your supplier that a Certificate of Analysis or Compliance is provided with each delivery. Often there are difficulties in pairing up these with specific deliveries as they are often sent as e mail attachments to commercial departments and are therefore not readily available to your warehouse staff. 

 

The simplest thing to do is construct a matrix for each material and supplier which details what checks you consider necessary. This can then be used by the warehouse staff at the point of receipt.

 

Be practical about it. The more complicated you make it the higher the chance of your warehouse staff missing something.



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Sharon (Dewsbury)

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Posted 22 December 2016 - 01:16 PM

Hi , I work in packaging. We manufacture carton/sleeves for food . We purchase board,  print it, cut and crease it then fold & glue it. We have controls for our board, inks and glue. These form part of our product. They are raw materials of our product.

WE have goods- in check that check for integrity only. As said below. The spec and food safety should all be in hand at the design, selection , purchasing.

Goods- in just need to check against  the delivery schedule to be sure you got what you ordered, and its in a good state.

i.e. the right stuff, the right quantity, clean and not damaged, infested, etc.






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