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HACCP plan in chicken pie production


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#1 nasia

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 01:06 PM

Hello everyone!

I was asked to make a haccp plan for the production of chicken and mushrooms pies. The truth is that it's the first time that I am going to work on haccp and I have no

background at all!Can anyone help me make a start?I am really confused and I cannot even do the flow diagram. Thank you very much!!

HACCP Plan Brief for the Production of Chicken and Vegetable Pies
Product and Process Description:
Raw materials, including diced raw chicken meat and prepared diced mushrooms and dry ingredients are obtained from suppliers and delivered directly to the site in temperature controlled vehicles, as appropriate. On delivery, raw materials are placed into storage, the chicken meat and mushrooms being stored in chill stores at 1-5ºC. Chicken meat is stored in a chill store specifically used for the storage of raw meat to ensure segregation from other materials.
Pies are produced on a daily basis in accordance with the production plan. Pie filling is manually prepared in accordance with the recipe/formulation sheet in 25kg batches. Diced chicken meat is browned in vegetable oil in a steam jacketed kettle to seal the surface of the meat. On completion, the diced mushrooms are added and browned. A stock is prepared in the kettle using vegetable bouillon, water, seasoning and herbs and brought to boiling point before being. simmered for 45 minutes. The stock, chicken meat and mushroom pie filling mixture is then thickened with a paste made from modified starch and water. The batch is held hot in the kettle at 75-80ºC until required for transfer to the production line. When required, the pie filling is poured into stainless steel wheeled tote bins, covered with a lid and taken to the depositor on the pie making line where it is pumped into the depositor hopper.

Pastry is prepared from a dry pastry mix supplied in 25kg sacks, Required amounts are manually dispensed into the hopper of a mixer (batches are normally 50-60kg in size) with any offcuts from previous batches (pastry offcuts are collected from the line automatically, stored under refrigeration (1-5ºC) and must be used within 24 hours or disposed of) and automatically blended with water under the control of the mixer software. Prepared pastry mixes are tipped into stainless steel tote bins and lidded before being transferred to one of two pastry sheeters where the bins are hoisted and the mix transferred to the hopper for the sheeter. For production of the bases of the pies, pastry is sheeted out and conveyed over ‘moulds’ (previously fitted with a pre-formed aluminium cases) before being ‘pressed’ into the base of the moulds.(blocking). The lined moulds then pass under the depositor where pie filling is deposited into the pie base. Pastry from the other sheeter is conveyed over the top of the pies as they leave the depositor and then laid mechanically over the open, filled pie bases before passing through a sealing and cutting device which forms a seal between the pastry in the pie base and the pastry of the pie lid before the pies are cut out and the offcuts and pies separated. Offcuts are collected in a stainless steel tote bin which, when full, is lidded, labelled with the contents and transferred to a chiller until required for adding back into the pastry mix, as described previously.

Pies are transferred by conveyor, through an egg based glaze spray (made from a glaze powder manually mixed with water using a stainless steel whisk) before being baked through a continuous band oven. The cooking temperature is set to achieve an internal temperature within the pies of a minimum of 77ºC but there is an adjustment possible on belt speed to achieve the correct product colour at the end of the baking process. Post baking, pies are transferred on conveyor into a blast chilling tunnel, where chilling brings the temperature of the product down to <10ºC over a period of 45 minutes. Post cooling, products are automatically removed (with the aluminium case) from the moulds and conveyed to a flow wrapping machine, where they are wrapped, labelled and date coded ( Packing date +10 days) before being packed by hand into cardboard outer transit cases. Completed outer cases are stacked onto pallets and taken to a chill store for storage until ready for distribution by a third party haulier.


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#2 mesophile

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 07:33 PM

Hi,

I am sorry, however not trying to be nasty but if you have no concepts of HACCP, should you really be the person responsible for writing the HACCP for your company?

There are lots of websites and sections on the Food Safety Network which can be used to formulate the basis for your HACCP plan, however HACCP is not just a paperwork excercise and should really be used in conjunction with your food safety management systems. To help, take a step back and look at your whole production process from goods in to your finished product(s) being despatched. At every stage within the operation is a section which should be shown on your HACCP flow diagram.

Once you have a flow diagram of every process step, you then need to decide on what is present for food safety (answer the 4 questions on the HACCP decision tree), which will give you your CCPs (critical control points). An example of one CCP would be cooking temperature/time - as this is used for food safety.

You also need to look at a robust prerequisite programme, to include staff training, production process, suppliers, ingredients, glass & hard plastic audits, personal hygiene, cleaning, etc...

My opinion would get yourself on a good HACCP training course quickly , maybe 2-3 days. This will not only help you write your HACCP, it will give you help and justification as to why you need to have CCPs, Prerequisites and GHP (good hygiene practises) /GMP (good manufacturing practises) within your factory.

Good Luck!

Regards,

Simon


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#3 nasia

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 09:07 PM

Dear Simon,

I do not own a company...I am just a master student in Food Technology!The haccp plan is a project I have to work on and I got really confused!

Thanks for your reply but to be honest, I do not completely understand everything!I am going to have a more thorough research on the subject, though!

Take care!

Nasia :rolleyes:


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 06:07 AM

Dear nasia,

It looks like yr production is intended to use a fully-cooked meat for adding to the pie base. I have attached a haccp plan for meat pie filling which could be the first stage in yr production. This is not a fully documented scientific analysis since it is intended for general caterers so it does not include important precursor steps such as described in previous post however it does illustrate the basics of a typical result which you can compare to yr own production details.
As already mentioned, to go from 1st step to the above will involve your reading up on haccp.

Complete HACCP system manuals do exist which guide you through the process with forms included etc, these are available for download in various forum threads here but they typically require a reasonable background in topics like microbiology first ??

Attached File  Simplified HACCP plan Meat Pie Filling - Food_Hazard_-_Caterers.pdf   479.53KB   149 downloads
(especially see Pg 10)

Rgds / Charles.C


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#5 mesophile

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:15 AM

DearNasia,

It’s a shame this is not in 6 months’ time as I am shortly changing career to be an MSc/BSc Food Technology Lecturer.

You need to look at the 12 steps for HACCP and go through each one at a time, as this is for your Masters, some of the steps can be made up:


1. Assemble HACCP Team
Develop a team that has the appropriate product specific knowledge and expertise to develop an effective food safety plan.

a. Technical Manager - Food Safety (LEADER)
b. Factory Manager - Plant and systems knowledge
c. NPD Manager - Product design and development
d. Engineering Manager - Equipment, maintenance and engineering specialist
e. Goods In/High Risk/Low Risk/Despatch Managers - Process flow, system and plant knowledge

2. Describe Product
a. Draw up a full descriptionof the product including composition, physical/chemical structure, microbial/ static treatments, packaging, storage conditions, and distribution methods.
b. Product Title: Cooked Chicken & Mushroom Pie
c. Product Description: Fully cooked Chicken & Mushroom Pie in Short-crust Pastry
d. Packaging: Aluminium Pie Base flow wrapped in polythene.
e. Microbial (i.e. Bacillus cereus, Salmonella), Physical (foreign bodies), Chemical (cleaning chemicals, lubricants, rodenticides), Allergens (wheat gluten, milk) – Detail all

3. Identify the intended use
Usage should be based on expected intended use of the product by the end user.

a. How Are Products Manufactured Consumed?
i. All products produced at XXX Company are consumed direct from pack,with no further cooking or preparation intended. These are therefore described as “ready to eat”.

b. What are the target population?
i. Children, Adults, Elderly

c. Who is the high risk groups involved in consuming the products produced?
i. Children, Elderly, Allergy Sufferers

d. Steps are taken within the manufacturing process to ensure products are produced to specification and safe to consume.

e. How are allergy sufferers made aware of any of the allergens present within the products produced?
i. All products produced at XXX Company are labelled with both ingredients and allergy statement underneath ingredients. Both state the allergens present within the product.
ii. Negative statements are not used at XXX Company, i.e. “may contain”,as all steps have been taken to ensure minimal risk of cross contamination are present.
iii. Positive statements are not used at XXX Company, i.e. “gluten free”,as regular allergen verification procedures have not been implemented to guarantee “free from” statements.

f. How are the products intended to be handled?
i. Stored in sealed primary packaging as purchased.

g. How are the products intended to be Prepared?
i. Products can be eaten cold direct from packaging, or can be reheated in oven.

h. How are the products intended to be Stored before Opening?
i. Chilled at 0-5°C

i. How are the products intended to be stored following opening of packaging?
i. Chilled at 0-5°C, to be consumed within 2 days of opening, or end of durability code, which ever comes first.

4. Construct flow diagram
a. Create a diagram that covers all steps of the operation including steps preceding and following the specified operation.
b. You need to include where waste is produced, where packaging is added or removed, and if any rework occurs, where this happens and where does the reworked product feedback in to the system again (pastry products pretty much always have rework).

5. On-site confirmation of flow diagram
a. Determine that the flow diagram is aligned with actual operations.
b. Walk through the process and check against the flow diagram you have made – has every step been accounted for? Could there be anything else missing?

6. Conduct a hazard analysis
a. Identify any biological,chemical or physical hazards.
b. Allergen hazards need to also be identified and normally come under “chemical”.

7. Determine Critical Control Points (CCPs).
a. CCPs are areas where previously identified hazards may be eliminated.
b. A CCP is a critical stepwithin the process operation that cannot be rectified further down the production line, for example, if the pies are not heated sufficiently to kill any pathogens this would result in a food safety issue that cannot be prevented further down the production line (as no further cooking takes place).
c. Examples you may use are: Cooking Temperature/time, Metal Detection, Labelling (allergens), Date Coding(to ensure products are not given too much life).

8. Establish Critical Limits
a. Develop processes that limit risk at CCPs.
b. What would be the critical limits? Temperature for an example would need to be sufficient to allow pasteurisation of the sauce/meat within the pies, therefore a core temperatureof <72°C for 10 minutes for example.

9. Monitor CCPs
a. Develop process for ensuring critical limits are followed.
b. How would you monitor the CCP’s? Metal detection would be monitored using a metal detector, Cooking temperature would be monitored using a calibrated thermometer.

10. Establish pre-planned corrective actions to be taken
a. For example, if the pies were not cooked sufficiently, a corrective action may be to re-cook.
b. If the metal detection system failed, a corrective action would be to re-metal detect all products since the last successful metal detection test.

11. Establish procedures for verification
a. How would you verify the systems are working correctly? Metal detection would be verified hourly using metal detection test sticks which would be inserted in to the pies and the metal detector should reject these in to a locked bin.
b. Oven temperature could be verified using annual calibration of the oven/thermometers.

12. Ensure proper documentation and records of HACCP process are maintained
a. All HACCP records must befully documented, for example: when checking oven temperature you will need arecording sheet that the production operatives/supervisors complete:

Date:
Product Title:
Batch:
Time In to Oven:
Time Out of Oven:
Product Core Temperature(<80°C):
Approved?:
Signed:
Action if Required


What Ihave written above is not set in stone by any means and is very basic, however should help you with your work. You will still need to design a process flow diagram and list all hazards, as per steps 4 & 6, however as Charles has stated above, there are plenty of HACCP manuals which can help guide you.

Good luck,


Simon

 


Edited by mesophile, 14 March 2014 - 11:20 AM.

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#6 nasia

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:20 PM

Dear Simon,

I am really grateful for the information you provided to me.They helped me a lot and I am starting to understand some aspects of haccp but to be honest, I still have so many questions and difficulties in making the plan!!:unsure:

Initially, if it is not of much trouble to you, I would like you to give me some more details about this part
" 2. Describe Product
a. Draw up a full descriptionof the product including composition, physical/chemical structure, microbial/ static treatments, packaging, storage conditions, and distribution methods."
I am not really sure what am I suppose to include...Thank you so much!!

P.S. I hope you do not mind if I ask for your help until I finish my project! Is it possible to send you parts of my work in order ti give me your opinion, if they are right or wrong??I would really appreciate that!!

Bests regards,
Nasia


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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 03:25 PM

Dear Nasia,

Based on yr current comments, I am afraid that you will have to do a lot of background reading to be able to produce a valid HACCP plan. Not sure how long you have for this project and how much detail is actually expected.

Maybe the material will be too difficult for you however i have below attached a complete HACCP package which starts from basic food safety concepts.

Attached File  Canada Manitoba HACCP advantage manual.pdf   2.44MB   88 downloads

This additional link is rather old now (no mention of prerequisites perhaps) but starts even more basic and contains some very nice material. All free to download.

http://www.icd-onlin...l/download.html

Hope that maybe of some usefulness. Good luck.

Rgds / Charles.C

PS The attachment below is from my archives and illustrates a partial (model) solution to yr overall objective with some additional self-check procedures included. May be of some use. :smile:

Attached File  HACCP Plan template cooked meat pies.pdf   63.31KB   98 downloads

PPS - there is also a discussion on haccp for baked meat pies here (one of the attachments contains a hazard analysis for meat pies [excluding pastry base] but does not do the analysis for ccps) -

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__40182


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#8 nasia

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:02 PM

Dear Charles,

I am really grateful for your help!!The information you provided helped me a lot!

Actually, I have to find the possible hazards and CCPs on a specific part of the whole process that is the above :

"Pies are transferred by conveyor, through an egg based glaze spray (made from a glaze powder manually mixed with water using a stainless steel whisk) before being baked through a continuous band oven. The cooking temperature is set to achieve an internal temperature within the pies of a minimum of 77ºC but there is an adjustment possible on belt speed to achieve the correct product colour at the end of the baking process."

Also I have to point the hazards of the raw materials : raw chicken, prepared mushrooms, seasonings, vegetable oil, herbs, vegetable buillon, modified starch and dry pastry.

Could you help me with that one?Thanks a lot!

Regards,
Nasia


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#9 Charles.C

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 03:57 AM

Dear nasia,

The most likely CCP in yr extract is the baking step.

Some typical hazards in your raw materials are listed in attachment below, (see HACCP plan in section 6).

Attached File  New zealand - processed-meats-cop-part-4.pdf   641.71KB   46 downloads
(credit link to Duncan :thumbup: )

Regards / Charles.C


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