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#1 Pizza&Sandwich

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 04:17 PM

We have several air lines in our production areas that are used to run several different machines. We also use air lines to clean. OSHA says that compressed air used for cleaning purposes must be reduced to 30 psi or less. How can we comply with OSHA without designating one air line per room for cleaning? Could gloves be used?


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#2 mesophile

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 04:36 PM

Hi,

 

I would say no, unless you can get written agreement from OSHA that would allow this. You can get regulator valves fitted to airlines that will reduce the pressure when you flip a switch or turn a valve. Designate a few lines that would be used for cleaning purposes and fit the regulator valves to these. When not required they shouldn't hinder your standard pressure, and when required, simply get an engineer or qualified personnel to adjust so pressure is reduced. See link below for details.

 

http://www.parker.co...word=REGULATORS

 

 

 

Many thanks,

 

Simon


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#3 john123

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:52 PM

Buy a regulator valve and install the quick couplers on it (like your hoses and nozzles already have), and then you can use it with any of your existing air lines and move it to where it's needed.  You can have your maintenance guy set it to 30psi and instruct anyone in charge of cleaning to make sure it stays at that setting.  Looking more at the OSHA code, you cal also buy specific cleaning nozzles that meet the requirement.  http://www.osha.gov/...-Attachment.pdf

 

Additional thought:  Most of the GFSI programs require the air to be clean and monitored for purity.  One solution I've found is a "point-of-use filtration" system, which removes liquids, oils and microbial contamination.  These can be made moveable as well so you can use them on any airline needed.  Could easily combine with the regulator to have a device that reduces your air to the safe 30psi and also meets clean air quality standards for whatever GFSI standards you go by (if any).  Good info related here:  http://www.parker.co...000200c1dacRCRD


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#4 Dai Williams

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:59 AM

We have several air lines in our production areas that are used to run several different machines. We also use air lines to clean. OSHA says that compressed air used for cleaning purposes must be reduced to 30 psi or less. How can we comply with OSHA without designating one air line per room for cleaning? Could gloves be used?

simple pressure reducers at the point of use $50 each will solve the problem


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#5 rjwildeman

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 02:33 AM

Its a combustible dust issue. They don't want dust particles being blown into the air. I would recommend shop vacs. Although I do not know your process or facility layout, so I don't know if this is feasible or not.


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#6 Pizza&Sandwich

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:02 PM

Its a combustible dust issue. They don't want dust particles being blown into the air. I would recommend shop vacs. Although I do not know your process or facility layout, so I don't know if this is feasible or not.

 

So if we use the air to clean in a wet room (no dust) we could use nozzles that reduce the pressure to 30 psi if it were deadheaded, but if it's used in a dry room, it needs to be 30 psi to control the dust?

 

We have 2 production rooms that are completely wash down rooms, then a third room that produces dough and therefore has quite a bit of flour dust. We do use shop vacs to clean our production line, but there are lots of little areas where flour hides.


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