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Designing & Implementing a Robust Foreign Material Prevention Prog

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#1 Simon

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:19 PM

Designing & Implementing a Robust Foreign Material Prevention Program
Robert Rogers, Sr Advisor for Food Safety & Regulations, Mettler-Toledo Product Inspection.


An introduction to the principles of metal detectors and X-ray systems providing an understanding of how they work. Factors affecting sensitivity and proper testing to provide an understanding of all the outside influences on MD and XR systems as well as proper testing and verification procedures to truly and completely challenge the systems to verify performance. Other items to consider that focus on system design highlighting the importance of controlling rejected product and determining root cause and corrective action.

If you have a question related to this presentation please post it below.

 

 

<<Link to the Webinar recording>>


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#2 Simon

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 01:58 PM

Thanks very much, very informative presentation Robert.   :clap:
Now even I know the basics (and a little more) about good product inspection.

We get many questions on the forums related to foreign body prevention, inspection and detection, I’m sure you have answered many of those. 

Your questions and comments from the webinar:

  • Does Moisture and salt levels of food products have an effect on sensitivity?
  • What type of metal detectors are most appropriate when packing bulk products e.g I Tonne sugar bags
  • You mention higher product temps impacting sensitivity. Are there ranges? (+100 deg F, +200 deg F, etc.)
  • What a great charts an information for this presentation. Wishing to have access to the info sooner
  • Grateful I am receiving you well here in Nairobi-Kenya
  • With new Technologies, what about humidity discrimination in products like poultry pieces or salads?
  • What applications might call for both a metal detector and an x-ray system?
  • Great presentation. Thank you
  • Normally foreign materials in our industry are metal, glass, hairs & threads. Is there a complete solution in one machine? If yes, what is about its cost?
  • THANK YOU ROBERT THAT WAS VERY INFORMATIVE
  • Is it require to calibrate the test pieces used in the metal detectors and what should be the frequency? Is there any specification mentioned in the standards.
  • What's the success ratio in detecting glass contaminants in food cans?
  • How often should metal detectors be calibrated?

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Simon Timperley
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Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


1. No spam, profanity, pornography, trolling or personal attacks

2. Topics and posts should be “on topic” and related to site content
3. No (unpaid) advertising
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5. Enjoy your stay!


#3 Robert Rogers

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 03:53 PM

Simon,
 
Thanks for a great event.
 
I want to address some of the questions and would welcome further questions in the future
 

Does Moisture and salt levels of food products have an effect on sensitivity?

Salinity is the saltiness or dissolved salt content (such as sodium chloride, magnesium and calcium sulfates, and bicarbonates) As the moisture and salinity of the product increases this increases the conductive nature of the product. As the product signal increases sensitivity must be adjusted to allow successful inspection of the product (no false rejects). Temperature, amount and packaging material are other factors that can effect sensitivity.

What type of metal detectors are most appropriate when packing bulk products e.g I Tonne sugar bags?

Typically large bulk applications call for a Gravity Feed Detector known commonly as a GF metal detector. These systems incorporate a diverter style reject where good product simply falls through the system to the bag and contaminated product is diverted to a reject bin.
 

You mention higher product temps impacting sensitivity. Are there ranges? (+100 deg F, +200 deg F, etc.)

At lower temperatures variations have a greater effect. As an example if a product is set to run at 0 degrees an it is passing through the system at 10 or even 5 degrees, this could have a significant impact on sensitivity. In contrast if the product is set to run at 100 degrees and it is passing through the system at 110 degrees the effect will not be as great.
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#4 Robert Rogers

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 04:12 PM

With new Technologies, what about humidity discrimination in products like poultry pieces or salads?

With an X-ray system you can set it to confirm the discriminator is present in the package as a verification as well as search for contaminants around it. As with any product it is a good idea to validate the capabilities individually for individual products.

What applications might call for both a metal detector and an x-ray system?

Systems should be implemented based on need and capability. If the hazard analysis identified potential for foreign material then an inspection system should be utilized as a part of a complete foreign material prevention strategy. There are certainly situations where what we want to detect dictates the systems and technology utilized and what processes implemented.

Normally foreign materials in our industry are metal, glass, hairs & threads. Is there a complete solution in one machine? If yes, what is about its cost?

The elusive "Silver Bullet" system does not exist and may never. It is important to have a complete program including prevention measures (no pens in production, hairnets, maintenance of equipment, supplier agreements), corrective action implementation and root cause investigations, control of non-conforming product (handling of rejected product).
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#5 Robert Rogers

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 04:34 PM

Is it require to calibrate the test pieces used in the metal detectors and what should be the frequency? Is there any specification mentioned in the standards?

 

 
Test pieces should be certified and traceable to a recognized standard such as NIST, ANSI, and ISO3290.
 

 What's the success ratio in detecting glass contaminants in food cans?

Inspection of the product prior to canning would be the most consistent method for inspection and therefore the area where best sensitivities can be achieved. After the product is in the can an multi or split beam X-ray system would be the ideal solution. A single beam X-ray can allow small areas of a can to be hidden from view as we must separate the can material from the product via masking tools in order to ignore the solid can. There are systems specially designed for can inspection.


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