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G.1.1.9 help - prevention of allergen cross-contamination

FSEP Allergen

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#1 Scampi

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 07:11 PM

So we have to put a may contain egg statement on our finished product as our species of poultry produce eggs very young. Egg could be on/in every bird. Section G.1.1.9 asks for procedures/policies to prevent the cross contamination of allergens inadvertently. Employee movement/sanitation etc. has ZERO impact on whether or not a carcass is contaminated by egg.  My question is, how to I satisfy CFIA and not make this something it isn't?


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#2 Esther

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Posted 05 June 2016 - 10:35 AM

Dear Scampi

 

I must confess that I was surprised when reading your topic. I had never thought about that.

I am writing from Spain in Europe.

 

First thing that come to my mind is …is it possible to validate your evisceration step in the slaughter  line so you can conclude whether there is a risk of egg cross contamination or not?

 

Also I will review the studies based on which the goverment has estableshed that the " may contain" statement applies to your product. I might find a clue or starting point to look for an argument.

 

Best regards

Esther


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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 05 June 2016 - 10:43 AM

Dear Scampi

 

I must confess that I was surprised when reading your topic. I had never thought about that.

I am writing from Spain in Europe.

 

First thing that come to my mind is …is it possible to validate your evisceration step in the slaughter  line so you can conclude whether there is a risk of egg cross contamination or not?

 

Also I will review the studies based on which the goverment has estableshed that the " may contain" statement applies to your product. I might find a clue or starting point to look for an argument.

 

Best regards

Esther

 

Hi scampi,

 

I presume this is a continuation of this thread -

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...hemical-hazard/

 

I'm surprised the issue hasn't (seemingly) caused any official reactions ?


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 Esther

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 01:53 PM

Many thanks Charles,

 

Following your link I had the opportinity to read other's comments.

 

Best regards

Esther


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#5 Scampi

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Posted 08 June 2016 - 02:44 PM

Update,

we label everything domestic as "may contain egg" which meets CFIA regulations, however, the FDA does not consider egg from our species to be an allergen at this time so our exports are stamped "export only"  We cannot validate as males and females are processed together

Just finished a Section 4 audit (entire HACCP program review) and my controls were accepted


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