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Primary Aromatic Amines (PAA) in plastic covers - Risk Analisys

PAA

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3 replies to this topic

#1 Cintia G. S.

Cintia G. S.

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:54 PM

Dear members of the forum:
 
I work on a risk analysis (FSSC 22000) for bottling a fatty food. Would you be able to guide me on some guidance about the significance of the PAAs derived from the dyes used in plastic covers?
 
We have different opinion with some auditors respect to significance of PAAs in hazard identification. Is they a Hazard if the dye is used in "Masterbach" and no directly in plastic cover?
 
Tank you.
Best regards.
 
CGS

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#2 Ehab Nassar

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 05:32 AM

Hello CGS ,

 

For me I would first look for the migration test results , this will provide a clear image , and will support the risk assessment , try to make the migration test looks identical to the usage method , same material and same temperature i.e. if using hot item e.f at 60 C the test should be close to this temperature with the same item,

 

there is a useful links , whoever it is little bit generic 

 

http://www.foodpacka...be-re-evaluated

 

http://www.bfr.bund....ml#topic_191659

 

https://www.google.c...-kXjIus4ODF3hGg

 

https://books.google...lastics&f=false

 

BR,

Ehab


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#3 Karenconstable

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 01:16 AM

Hi CGS,

 

You should be aware that the masterbatch is the 'ingredient' of the plastic that contains the dye/pigment.  So if the dye is in the masterbatch then it is also in the plastic cover and it is in direct contact with the food. 

 

As Ehab says, migration testing is a great place to start.  There are migration limits for food contact materials set by US FDA and by EC.  These limits are used as a means to define "food-safe" plastics even in parts of the world where those rules/limits don't apply under legislation. 

 

Karen


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#4 Cintia G. S.

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 12:38 AM

Hello CGS ,

 

For me I would first look for the migration test results , this will provide a clear image , and will support the risk assessment , try to make the migration test looks identical to the usage method , same material and same temperature i.e. if using hot item e.f at 60 C the test should be close to this temperature with the same item,

 

there is a useful links , whoever it is little bit generic 

 

http://www.foodpacka...be-re-evaluated

 

http://www.bfr.bund....ml#topic_191659

 

https://www.google.c...-kXjIus4ODF3hGg

 

https://books.google...lastics&f=false

 

BR,

Ehab

 


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