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Eradicating black mould from porous surfaces

Black mould eradication

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#1 Alistair

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 06:33 PM

Hi, we are a start-up manufacturer at the pilot production stage of introducing a new product. One of the process steps involves a machine with a felt conveyor belt, which is used to transport yeast based dough through cutting blades. The belt cannot be removed or easily accessed (4+ hours work). The belt is covered in black mould spots after a few weeks use. How could we eradicate the mould and prevent re-occurrence? The belts cannot be easily washed or dried as they run tight across the machine. Is there a food contact safe spray I could use that would kill the mould spores, roots and all, but not taint the product?


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#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 09:04 PM

Not coming from a bakery perspective here, so I may be way off base with my expectations.

 

If it is porous and cannot be effectively cleaned while on the machine, you're probably going to have to take it off more often. Sorry, this isn't a simple solution and will either require you to clean more often or use a different material. The fact that you have a food contact surface that you mention gets moldy after "a few weeks use" tells me that you are absolutely not cleaning your facility often enough. The presence of visible mold colonies is not an indicator that things need to get cleaned, it's an indicator that they aren't being cleaned at any level that is effective. Your equipment should be cleaned before mold has a chance to grow. Not after it has grown and been getting into your product.

 

The best option available may be some kind of steam based belt sanitizer, those are used for some produce belts. If you're spraying them you can use a food contact level of Quat which will leave a residual to help prevent spores from germinating, however it will not kill the spores. Mold spores require heat or powerful oxidizers to destroy (e.g. perasetic acid). They're probably showing up from the dough itself, then growing once the belt becomes fouled with food product in the pores.

 

This company seems to have some felt belt replacements that are more cleanable, but I can't speak for the product: http://www.habasit.c...anline-belt.htm

 

Out of curiosity, I'd want to ask you how many hours of labor per day are dedicated to sanitation in your plant, and maybe we can provide some perspective for you to bring back to management. There's a fairly interesting discussion about sanitation in bakeries on the forum here: http://www.ifsqn.com...tation-program/

 

 

 

 

This company seems to have some felt belt replacements that are more cleanable: http://www.habasit.c...anline-belt.htm

 

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For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 


#3 Charles.C

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 12:42 AM

Hi, we are a start-up manufacturer at the pilot production stage of introducing a new product. One of the process steps involves a machine with a felt conveyor belt, which is used to transport yeast based dough through cutting blades. The belt cannot be removed or easily accessed (4+ hours work). The belt is covered in black mould spots after a few weeks use. How could we eradicate the mould and prevent re-occurrence? The belts cannot be easily washed or dried as they run tight across the machine. Is there a food contact safe spray I could use that would kill the mould spores, roots and all, but not taint the product?

 

Hi Alistair,

 

I presume you already must have some kind of cleaning/sanitation procedure ???

 

My first action would be to go to supplier of machinery. Very likely they have seen it all before.

 

Sometimes, unfortunately, it can simply be a "bad" one. Or a faulty Process. Hopefully neither.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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