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SQF Level 2 or 3?


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#1 esquef

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 03:42 PM

Hi, I'm relatively new to SQF and am coordination the certification effort for my company. They want to get Level 3 certification, but due to the fact that we are co-manufacturers/co-packers and don't really sell anything retail it seem to me that Level 2 is where we should be shooting for. What do you SQF experts think?

Thanks in advance for any input.



#2 ubtoo

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 04:21 PM

Eventually your going to have to get Level 3....depending on your customers. Most of what I've seen and heard is if you only go for level 2...in the future your customer is going to require Level 3 soon after. Of course, this is your choice. Good Luck!



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#3 John Antecki

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 11:14 PM

To be honest SQF Level three just incorporates both Level 1 & 2, plus the third level is a full on Food Quality Plan aka Quality control point using the HACCP method. so there will in the end be 2 HACCP plans one for Safety, and one for Quality. If your plant is HACCP certified and you got a great program a good plan template to use, (Where did you do you HACCP training?) and not a million products to copack then go for it!
We should keep in contact! i also work for a Contract manufacture.



#4 esquef

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 07:01 PM

To be honest SQF Level three just incorporates both Level 1 & 2, plus the third level is a full on Food Quality Plan aka Quality control point using the HACCP method. so there will in the end be 2 HACCP plans one for Safety, and one for Quality. If your plant is HACCP certified and you got a great program a good plan template to use, (Where did you do you HACCP training?) and not a million products to copack then go for it!
We should keep in contact! i also work for a Contract manufacture.


Hi John, thanks for your reply. My HACCP training was through GMA. My concern with Level 3 SQF is that we do in fact co-pack an enormous number of products, plus we're growing very quickly, so people wear a lot of hats here. Keeping up with the additional documentation required to maintain Level 3 status would be very daunting for all concerned here, and I'm just afraid that it would make recertification a significant challange. Has your company been through the certification process?

#5 Tony-C

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 02:21 PM

Hi, I'm relatively new to SQF and am coordination the certification effort for my company. They want to get Level 3 certification, but due to the fact that we are co-manufacturers/co-packers and don't really sell anything retail it seem to me that Level 2 is where we should be shooting for. What do you SQF experts think?

Thanks in advance for any input.


Hi there,

Sounds like you have a lot of work to achieve level 3 and could end up running around like a headless chicken trying to get everyting shipshape.

If none of your customers require level 3 and taking into consideration level 2 is GFSI recognised (It is called a HACCP Based Code and by insinuation a food safety certification) it sounds to me that level 2 would be your best option. Walk before you can run comes to mind but it does depend on how established your systems are already.

Regards,

Tony

#6 John Antecki

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 02:45 PM

Hi there,

Sounds like you have a lot of work to achieve level 3 and could end up running around like a headless chicken trying to get everyting shipshape.

If none of your customers require level 3 and taking into consideration level 2 is GFSI recognised (It is called a HACCP Based Code and by insinuation a food safety certification) it sounds to me that level 2 would be your best option. Walk before you can run comes to mind but it does depend on how established your systems are already.

Regards,

Tony


Amen Tony,
I couldn't imagine doing a great multitude of "HACCP for Quality" Plans Unless I absolutely had to!
John>>>

Edited by John Antecki, 18 November 2010 - 02:47 PM.


#7 esquef

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 05:12 PM

Thanks for the advice folks!



#8 Cathy

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 06:07 PM

Many companies start at level 2 and move to level 3 in the following year. I recommend doing it that way. Your concern about growth is interesting to me. If you implement systems that make sense - built to add value and control - it will help you through the growth - not just impose more paperwork. SQF can be done in a way that makes sense - not just a way to generate paperwork and paint a pretty picture for some auditor. Remember much of it is risk based - if you can demonstrate lack of risk - you can be exempted from some things. The other items - that perhaps are a risk - need to be controlled as a matter of good business anyway. I tell my clients over and over...don't over-complicate your system. DOn't shoot yourself in the foot. You can make this work for you - but start with a successful level 2 certification and then move on.


Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/

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#9 esquef

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 06:55 PM

Many companies start at level 2 and move to level 3 in the following year. I recommend doing it that way. Your concern about growth is interesting to me. If you implement systems that make sense - built to add value and control - it will help you through the growth - not just impose more paperwork. SQF can be done in a way that makes sense - not just a way to generate paperwork and paint a pretty picture for some auditor. Remember much of it is risk based - if you can demonstrate lack of risk - you can be exempted from some things. The other items - that perhaps are a risk - need to be controlled as a matter of good business anyway. I tell my clients over and over...don't over-complicate your system. DOn't shoot yourself in the foot. You can make this work for you - but start with a successful level 2 certification and then move on.



Thanks for all the excellent advice!

Edited by esquef, 21 December 2010 - 02:28 PM.


#10 MQA

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 10:12 AM

As a selling point to ALL your customers (large and small, wholesale and retail), the quality element of the SQF is an excellent advantage.

One you have SQF in place, you'll realise the importance of quality to ensure better attention towards safety.

Quality Assurance simply makes sense as a partnership with safety and regulatory requirements.

Quality, Allergen and Regulatory is also quite easy to slip into an existing HACCP program.

Much luck with your decision making!



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