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#1 Rosemary4

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:39 PM

Hi, does anyone have a copy of the latest Marks & Spencer's standard or criteria. We have just had an interesting conversation with a rep from a company that sells metal detection and x-ray machines who tells me that M&S will permit up to a 1.5mm piece of metal or other contaminent in their packaging products.

As we get black bits as a matter of course in recycled PET as a result of the post consumer waste we usually reject larger ones due to aesthetic nature.

I was wondering if anyone had a copy of the M&S standards or criteria for this that they could share with me please?


#2 Scotty

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 03:07 PM

these may be of use

regards

Attached Files



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#3 Brian Meek

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:48 AM

Hi Rosemary4

When you go for final inspection how can you be sure if the contaminant is in the packaging or the product?

If its in the packaging and just hanging on by a thread and if the consumer empties the product and it comes away with it what then?

Best and only policy if you want to stay out of trouble is - No Metal.

The companies that supply this type of product also use metal detection so in most cases so it should not get to you, and if it does reject it because it is out of your specification.

Kind regards

Brian



#4 Rosemary4

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:35 AM

Thanks for the documents Scotty, much appreciated.

#5 Rosemary4

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:36 AM

Hi Rosemary4

When you go for final inspection how can you be sure if the contaminant is in the packaging or the product?

If its in the packaging and just hanging on by a thread and if the consumer empties the product and it comes away with it what then?

Best and only policy if you want to stay out of trouble is - No Metal.

The companies that supply this type of product also use metal detection so in most cases so it should not get to you, and if it does reject it because it is out of your specification.

Kind regards

Brian



#6 Rosemary4

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:47 AM

This is alot of the problem Brian. Much of our product is stacked and it is impossible to check every forming. A visual check of top and bottom and all round stack is all there is time to carry out. We have hourly quality checks but alot can be manufactured between checks.

The metal tends to come from the machine if there is a problem. Obviously the product is 100% checked if metal is found and the problem traced and corrected.

The well known metal detrection and x ray machine company who came in yesterday saw the specks we get an said they couldn't help. The machinery wouldn't pick up what human eyes had seen.

Unfortunately due to purchasing restrictions only material needed for a job is bought, we don't hold stock unless it is left over from previous jobs so a decision has to be made as to the running of it. It is always reported to the supplier but their lead time can be 6 weeks to get replacement material.



#7 Charles.C

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 10:27 PM

Hi, does anyone have a copy of the latest Marks & Spencer's standard or criteria. We have just had an interesting conversation with a rep from a company that sells metal detection and x-ray machines who tells me that M&S will permit up to a 1.5mm piece of metal or other contaminent in their packaging products.

As we get black bits as a matter of course in recycled PET as a result of the post consumer waste we usually reject larger ones due to aesthetic nature.

I was wondering if anyone had a copy of the M&S standards or criteria for this that they could share with me please?


Dear Rosemary,

I am not familiar with the PET recycling process / limitations however i interpret the above as that the rep is stating that, for yr specific matrix, "their" equipment will detect (unspecified) "metal" if >=1.5mm.

This may well be some kind of reasonable statement of unavoidable machine fact.

However any (hopeful?) parallel criterion that smaller but, apparently clearly visible, particles are "aesthetically" acceptable will surely also relate to absolute frequencies of occurrence, eg qualitatively speaking - rare or often. Plus the intended application. ?

Offhand, sounds more like a rep's "pitch" although there may be "some" acceptance reality within it since presumably M&S are also familiar with MDts. :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 moskito

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 04:13 PM

Hi,

as far as I no, M&S has update 4-5 CoPs recently in June 2012, e.g. metal detection and hygiene






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