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"SQF Approved" definition of Product Contact Surfaces?


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#1 Gail K

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 01:58 PM

Does anybody have an "SQF Approved" definition of Product Contact Surfaces?



#2 esquef

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 06:06 PM

I think it's universally defined as "any surface with which product makes contact". :shades:



#3 psunjka

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 11:28 AM

I would go a little further. Due to regulatory concerns, we've been using this definition of a food contact surface: it is a surface that comes into contact with food on a regular basis during regular operations. For example, we have a wide belt with four rows of our products. "Row" surface on this belt is considered as FCS, but small gap in between rows is considered as accidental food contact surface.



#4 Tony-C

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 12:26 PM

Not sure I like the term 'accidental' maybe 'potential' is more appropriate. Either way if there is possible contact they should be regarded as a food contact surface.



#5 MM1

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:41 AM

I agree with 'esquef' that any surface where product comes in contact during processing is product contact surface.



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 12:48 PM

Two quotable responses - 

 

FSIS

A food contact surface is any surface that may come in direct contact with exposed product. Examples would include conveyor belts, table tops, saw blades, augers, and stuffers.

http://askfsis.custh...aWQvT1JDNXBndmw=

 

FDA

A food product contact surface is defined as a surface in "direct contact with food residue, or where food residue can drip, drain, diffuse, or be drawn" (FDA, 2004b). Because these surfaces, if contaminated, can directly result in food product contamination, rigid sanitary design criteria must be met. Non-product contact surfaces are those that are part of the equipment (e.g., legs, supports, housings) that do not directly contact food. As contamination of non-product contact surfaces can cause indirect contamination of the food product, these surfaces cannot be ignored with regard to sanitary design.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs119

 

and a sort of interpretation of the 2nd one maybe - 

Food contact surfaces are defined in the GMP as those surfaces that contact human food and those surfaces from which drainage onto the food or onto surfaces that contact the food ordinarily occurs during the normal course of operations. Food-contact surfaces include utensils and food-contact surfaces of equipment.

Attached File  sanitary operations - module07.pdf   2.01MB   66 downloads

(quite nice compilation)

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Thanked by 2 Members:

#7 esquef

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 01:00 PM

I think it's important to keep in mind that food contact packaging falls into this category as well.



#8 Urban Explorer

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 12:57 PM

I'm not promoting USDA here, but FSIS is very strict in their guidelines about what is considered a FCS and a NFCS for their listeria guidelines.  That will give you the best and most concise answer because SQF is so vague.

 

We've separated our operation into zones.

 

Zone 1 - Food contact surface inside the processing room (where all food and food contact packaging is used/exposed) that comes in direct contact with the food itself, which also includes employees!

Zone 2 - Non food contact surface inside the processing room is a surface or area which does not directly contact the food but through mechanical means may find its way to a FCS (drip, drain, splash)

Zone 3 - Area outside the processing room that does not contact any food and is unlikely to do so unless brought in by mechanical means (forklift wheels, boxes, condensation in the cooler, etc)

Zone 4 - an area highly unlikely to ever contaminate food directly or harbor bacteria (pallet racks, dock doors)






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