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Can anyone describe sanitization procedure of Fruits & Vegetables


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#1 sheoran.rajnish

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 07:10 AM

Hi dear all,

I want to know the different procedures and method of sanitization of fruits and vegetables to reduce the microbial load.

Regards,

Rajnish



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 07:23 AM

Hi dear all,

I want to know the different procedures and method of sanitization of fruits and vegetables to reduce the microbial load.

Regards,

Rajnish

 

It depends on what you mean by sanitization but the generic answer will probably be a book on Processing fruits and vegetables.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 sheoran.rajnish

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 07:30 AM

CAN WE DO SANITIZATION THROUGH VINEGAR, IF YES THEN WHAT SHOULD BE THE CONCENTRATION



#4 Charles.C

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 08:25 AM

CAN WE DO SANITIZATION THROUGH VINEGAR, IF YES THEN WHAT SHOULD BE THE CONCENTRATION

 

Sanitization = ? 6D/L.monocytogenes ?

Process ?

leafy vegetables, bean sprouts, melons ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 SUSHIL

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:28 PM

Hello sheoran.rajnish,

 

Commonly used sanitizers for treatment of fresh fruit and vegetables include:

 

•   Halogens (e.g. chlorine (100-200ppm), chlorine dioxide, iodine, bromide);

•   Ionic   compounds   (e.g.   trisodium   phosphate   TSP,   quaternary ammonium compounds, organic acids);

•   Active oxygen compounds (e.g. hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, ozone);

•   Irradiation and pulsed light treatments (e.g. ionizing radiation, UV

light, infrared);

•   Hurdle  technology  (multiple   above-mentioned   procedures   that supplement and enhance each other).

 

The effectiveness of each individual method of sanitization is influenced by many factors, including water temperature, pH, contact time, organic matter content and surface morphology of the produce.

 

Attached below the document which contains topic on cleaning and sanitising of fresh fruitd and vegetables,

 



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:51 PM

Dear Sushil,

 

Thks for the input.

 

So how about vinegar ? (an organic acid)

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS - the mentions seem rather antique, perhaps abandoned ? -

 

Although organic acids have had limited use with produce, washes and sprays
containing organic acids have been used successfully to disinfect meat. Because
the addition of organic acids directly or in washes can lead to reductions in
pathogenic microorganisms, applying vinegar or lemon juice holds promise as an
inexpensive treatment for decontamination of fresh fruits and vegetables (Castillo
and Escartin, 1994; Zhang and Faber, 1996)

added - (Just noticed the article is 2002 so maybe not ?)


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 infoiqc

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 02:14 PM

Are these guides from the FDA applicable?

Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards of Fresh-cut Fruits and Vegetables

http://www.fda.gov/F...n/ucm064458.htm

Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

http://www.fda.gov/F...n/ucm064574.htm

 

Gail



#8 Charles.C

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 02:57 PM

Dear sheoran.rajnish,

 

As previously noted, the context is relevant.

 

eg -

http://www.bestfoodf...t/fruit-vinegar

 

http://www.fda.gov/F...s/ucm091363.htm

(details on use of organic acids / practical info. but refs mostly pre-2000)

 

Acetic acid is approvable for "organic" purposes. It is also a constituent of other so-called "New Generation" commercial products, eg -

 

Attached File  farm cleaning-sanitizing guide, 2013.pdf   2.63MB   68 downloads

(note the word "minimize" for microbial reduction)

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

 


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#9 chris j

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 01:07 PM

I do not believe any solution is considered a kill step, all just lower the potential microbial load. An important consideration is if your wash water sanitizer is not working properly it may be spreading contamination.



#10 CaliforniaFS

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:21 PM

What type of fruit and/or vegetable are you sanitizing? I can provide some feedback with this information. 



#11 Charles.C

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 04:36 PM

Dear sheoran.rajnish,

 

Was the information in previous posts of any value ??

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#12 sheoran.rajnish

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:33 AM

has little value,



#13 sheoran.rajnish

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:33 AM

Is anyone using vinegar as sanitizing agent for vegetables like potato/bottle gaurd, tomato/pumpkin? If using, at what concentration it is effective?



#14 BarrieT

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 02:17 PM

You could try:

 

https://www.hygienea...gory=salad-wash



#15 Snookie

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 04:42 PM

As someone with an extensive background in produce, most major companies are not using vinegar and are unlikely to especially after the cantaloupe debacle in  Colorado.  The usual cleaners are chlorine and Hydrogen peroxide-peracetic acid wash.  Each with their own advantages and disadvantages.  But the liability alone means that most are going to stick with tried and true.  While the vinegar may have some appeal to those interested in organic, vinegar does not enough history or trial yet. 


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#16 Charles.C

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 05:00 AM

has little value,

Dear sheoran.rajnish,

 

Sorry about that.

 

Your comment does appear to be a reasonable summary of opinions regarding the sole use of vinegar on a commercial scale.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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