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SQF 2.9.5 Language, Handling Multiple Language Issues


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#1 samframe56

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 06:48 PM

Looking for some advice.  2.9.5.1 Training materials and the delivery of training shall be provided in language understood by staff.  Normally this isn't such a big topic as most places have at the max 2 or 3 different language.  Due to our location and business we have 5 separate languages in the plant that require interpreters to understand some of the documentation.  Looking for someone out there with a similar issue where they have successfully navigated it.

 

Thanks



#2 Snookie

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 10:58 PM

:welcome:  to the forum.  Most languages I have had to deal with at one time was 4.  English, Spanish, Burmese and Ethiopian.  We had to have all relevant documents translated and hired translators to come in and translate the actual training and to translate questions and comments.  It was difficult but it worked. 


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#3 RG3

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 12:35 AM

Samframe56,

 

You have some work in front of you or at least for your translator. Not only do your trainings need to be translated but also your Management Commitment Policy, SOP's, and in some cases your Quality/Food Safety Manual and its documents because it needs to be understood by all relevant staff.

 

Snookie,

 

Burmese... :eek_yello: ...that can make a one page English GMP Policy into 5 pages after being translated into Burmese.



#4 samframe56

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 02:06 PM

Samframe56,

 

You have some work in front of you or at least for your translator. Not only do your trainings need to be translated but also your Management Commitment Policy, SOP's, and in some cases your Quality/Food Safety Manual and its documents because it needs to be understood by all relevant staff.

 

Snookie,

 

Burmese... :eek_yello: ...that can make a one page English GMP Policy into 5 pages after being translated into Burmese.

You are correct I do have a bit of work ahead of me.  Thanks for you input, both of you as it helps put the project inter perspective.



#5 Snookie

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 10:40 PM

Samframe56,

 

You have some work in front of you or at least for your translator. Not only do your trainings need to be translated but also your Management Commitment Policy, SOP's, and in some cases your Quality/Food Safety Manual and its documents because it needs to be understood by all relevant staff.

 

Snookie,

 

Burmese... :eek_yello: ...that can make a one page English GMP Policy into 5 pages after being translated into Burmese.

Yeah the Burmese, and the Ethiopian was a huge challenge.   But as big of a headache as it was, the people were so sweet.  They were refugees who were so happy to be here. 


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#6 Tony-C

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 01:45 AM

Looking for some advice.  2.9.5.1 Training materials and the delivery of training shall be provided in language understood by staff.  Normally this isn't such a big topic as most places have at the max 2 or 3 different language.  Due to our location and business we have 5 separate languages in the plant that require interpreters to understand some of the documentation.  Looking for someone out there with a similar issue where they have successfully navigated it.

 

Thanks

 

Hi Samframe56,

 

Where there are a few different languages there is value in providing relevant translations.

 

I once worked at a site in London where there were an estimated 50 different nationalities, in this situation providing translations was impractical and we verified the competency of the employees in the business language.

 

Some organizations provide language training as an alternative to translations.

 

In all cases verifying understanding, usually by competency assessment, is necessary.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



#7 Natasham

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Posted 10 October 2014 - 06:16 AM

Hi Samframe,

 

What we did where I work (we work with people from 4-5 different nationalities such as Polish, Slovakian, Bulgarian, Czech) was to organize language training programmes as Tony said which included the basic terminology of food hygiene and safety and terminology of our business sector which was quite successfull. At the same time we have placed "pictorial" work instructions / prohibitions etc in all working areas which are understood by everyone. When the training finished we did a "food hygiene" and "good practises" knowledge test so as to verify that it was effective.

 

Natasham



#8 marthac

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 01:29 PM

Training may be a challenge with the language issue, however, your documents are easily translated in Microsoft Word. Cut and paste your document to Microsoft Word. Click on Review. Under Review click Translate. You have the option on the right to elect translate from and to languages. Click Translate the whole document. Click yes to continue. Then cut and paste the translation to a new page. My documents are now English on one side, Spanish on the other. Good luck on the training.



#9 Snookie

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 05:01 PM

Training may be a challenge with the language issue, however, your documents are easily translated in Microsoft Word. Cut and paste your document to Microsoft Word. Click on Review. Under Review click Translate. You have the option on the right to elect translate from and to languages. Click Translate the whole document. Click yes to continue. Then cut and paste the translation to a new page. My documents are now English on one side, Spanish on the other. Good luck on the training.

 

First :welcome: .   While I understand the concept....that one makes me a bit nervous.  Having many Latin friends from places such as Chile, Spain and different parts of Mexico, they all use Spanish differently.  Just as in the UK what they call a lift we in the US call an elevator.  Someone I know who is Italian can tell where they are from based on how they use the language.  It might be enough to get the concept across or it might just be confusing. 


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