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Canadian Organic Regime approved hand sanitizer?


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#1 Abby7

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 04:00 PM

Hi,

We are a berry processing facility located in Canada working to become organically certified.

 

Does anyone know of a hand sanitizer which is food grade & accepted by COR standards - meeting CAN/CGSB 32 310 1.4 - (Table 7.3 - permitted to be applied to gloves without a removal event)?

 

Any guidance would be much appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Abby7



#2 Scampi

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 05:18 PM

you can get both of these in spray format or you should be able to get alcohol based gel that will pass


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#3 Scampi

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 05:18 PM

BTW why are your employees wearing gloves???


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#4 Abby7

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 05:46 PM

Scampi,

Did you mean to include an attachment with your reply?

 

Employees where disposable blue nitrile gloves - we have a 'no bare hands on food product' policy.

 

Thanks,



#5 Scampi

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 07:37 PM

LOL yes I did

 

Both IPA and alcohol are on the list of approved without a rinse.........but that table is for equipment and both may break down nitrile gloves.  I personnaly prefer clean hands to gloves everytime (people do weird things with gloves on they'd never do with bare hands! :)

 

Just asking because it's not very "organic" to use disposable gloves is all

 

Alcohol, ethyl (ethanol)

This water-soluble chemical compound is effective against fungi, bacteria (in their growth phase but not spores), Mycobacterium, and certain viruses, including Norovirus.

It is not effective against spores.

It is most effective at a concentration of 60%-90% in water. Activity drops sharply when diluted below a 50% concentration.

Used as a component of fruit and vegetable wash products.

In the healthcare setting, “alcohol” refers to two water-soluble chemical compounds—ethyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol—that have generally underrated germicidal characteristics. FDA has not cleared any liquid chemical sterilant or high-level disinfectant with alcohol as the main active ingredient. These alcohols rapidly kill (not just slow down growth) vegetative forms of bacteria but do not  destroy bacterial spores. They also destroy fungi, viruses and mycobacteria.

Alcohol, isopropyl

Also known as rubbing alcohol, this is an effective disinfectant against bacteria, viruses and fungi.

This is not effective against spores. This is most effective at 60%-90% in water. Activity drops sharply when diluted below a 50% concentration.


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#6 Abby7

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 12:13 AM

HI,

I agree that disposable gloves don't seem very organic - but we are working with fresh and frozen berries and it is the typical practice in this industry for the staff to wear nitirle gloves to protect both the customer and their sking (though I understand your comment about the potential for weird things to occur - gloves or not)!.

Thanks for the details re: the IPA and alcohol - now to just find a food grade product which is readily available.

 

Thanks for your time and knowledge!

Abby7



#7 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 04:17 AM

Dear Abby7,

We are NOP and NPOP certified company and we are using sanitizers permitted as per USDA, hope this will help you.

 
Sanitizers
Sanitizers differ from cleansers in that their purpose is to kill microorganisms, not to
remove soil or other debris. Sanitizers are applied after food-contact surfaces are cleaned.
Sanitizers also may be applied to fresh produce to kill harmful surface microorganisms or
added to wash water for fruits, vegetables, eggs, poultry, and meat products.
Section 205.605 of the National List explicitly mentions these allowed sanitizers:
• Acidified sodium chlorite
• Chlorine materials (including bleach)
• Hydrogen peroxide
• Ozone
• Peracetic acid/Peroxyacetic acid
Specific brand names of approved sanitizers can be found on the OMRI or WSDA lists,
although other products also may comply with the USDA Organic Regulations. The lists
also mention any particular restrictions or other allowed uses. Some sanitizers leave
residues on the equipment. In such cases, depending on the sanitizer you are using,
the certifying agent may require you to have a plan to remove residues as well as a way to
document that residues have been removed.
Chlorine
Chlorine is one of the most commonly used sanitizers, both for food-contact surfaces
and on agricultural products. As listed in § 205.605 (b) “Synthetics allowed,” chlorine
materials are allowed for “disinfecting and sanitizing food contact surfaces” in organic
processing. The regulation also states that “residual chlorine levels in the water shall not
exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act,”
which is currently 4 parts per million (ppm) chlorine. The NOP 5026 guidance document,
“The Use of Chlorine Materials in Organic Production and Handling,” clarifies
the allowed use of chlorine. The online address for the document is listed in this chapter
under “Online resources.”
When washing produce, the rinse water that makes final contact with the organic
product must not contain more than 4 ppm chlorine. In other words, a food product,
such as apples, may be bathed in water containing a higher concentration of chlorine if
doing so is permitted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, but that product
must receive a final rinse of water containing no more than 4 ppm chlorine. The procedures
used to wash produce and to monitor chlorine levels in the wash water must
be included in the OSP.
You must include all cleansers and sanitizers on your OSP, and they must be approved
by your certifying agent before you use them. Review § 205.605 to get familiar with the
diversity of materials listed. The latest version of the list can be accessed from the NOP Web
site under the tab Organic Regulations. The online address is listed in this chapter under
“Online resources.”

Regards

Mahantesh


Edited by mahantesh.micro, 28 June 2019 - 04:29 AM.


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#8 Abby7

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 11:15 PM

We now have an approved glove sanitizer - as per the CFIA for handling organic products.

 

I am not certain if is appropriate to mention actual brands on this forum - so won't unless advised it is acceptable.

 

Thanks to the others on the forum for providing guidance.

 

Abby7






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