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Product Rework Clarification


Best Answer pHruit, 07 August 2019 - 02:57 PM

Not SQF, but I'd definitely give the "new" product a traceability code of its own.

In terms of identifying the history of a batch, the original code links you through to the raw material and the processing involved in e.g. making the whole peeled potatoes.

When you reprocess these you are further changing the material, so having a unique code for the resulting product allows you to differentiate it from the original "finished" product that subsequently became the raw material.

It might be possible to have your own systems set up to not require this, but I do think it makes it much clearer and therefore would always prefer it as an approach.

 

Not familiar with the SQF guidance, but in general "recouping" is concerned with getting something back that was, or would otherwise be, lost. In the example you gave of the whole potato / French fries, the latter allows you to recoup (get back, or realise) the value of the whole potato that would otherwise be lost if you'd had to just dispose of them.

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#1 jperri

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 02:28 PM

Hello,

 

I was hoping to have some clarification on Product Rework. We are new to SQF and working our way to certification so right now we do not have a product rework program in place, but I feel we need to implement one.

 

To give some context, we are a small potato processing plant that washes, peels, cuts, dices, slices raw potatoes and packages them for further processing. Whether a mistake was made or a client changed their mind, sometimes we are able to rework the finished product (for example whole peeled potatoes are re-processed into pre-cut fries).

 

Would the traceability code change for this "new" product? or could I use the same code with record of the fact that this product was reworked.

 

In terms of packaging, if we re-pack a finished product does that also fall under rework? Sometimes the supplier will reject our shipment due to a defect in packaging resulting in us repacking it and shipping it again... the packaging is typically boxes.

 

Thank you for your help!!!

 

Ps. Can someone define the term recoup :oops:  (seen in guidance document).

 

Jenna

 

 

 

 



#2 pHruit

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 02:57 PM   Best Answer

Not SQF, but I'd definitely give the "new" product a traceability code of its own.

In terms of identifying the history of a batch, the original code links you through to the raw material and the processing involved in e.g. making the whole peeled potatoes.

When you reprocess these you are further changing the material, so having a unique code for the resulting product allows you to differentiate it from the original "finished" product that subsequently became the raw material.

It might be possible to have your own systems set up to not require this, but I do think it makes it much clearer and therefore would always prefer it as an approach.

 

Not familiar with the SQF guidance, but in general "recouping" is concerned with getting something back that was, or would otherwise be, lost. In the example you gave of the whole potato / French fries, the latter allows you to recoup (get back, or realise) the value of the whole potato that would otherwise be lost if you'd had to just dispose of them.



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#3 jperri

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 04:58 PM

Not SQF, but I'd definitely give the "new" product a traceability code of its own.

In terms of identifying the history of a batch, the original code links you through to the raw material and the processing involved in e.g. making the whole peeled potatoes.

When you reprocess these you are further changing the material, so having a unique code for the resulting product allows you to differentiate it from the original "finished" product that subsequently became the raw material.

It might be possible to have your own systems set up to not require this, but I do think it makes it much clearer and therefore would always prefer it as an approach.

 

Not familiar with the SQF guidance, but in general "recouping" is concerned with getting something back that was, or would otherwise be, lost. In the example you gave of the whole potato / French fries, the latter allows you to recoup (get back, or realise) the value of the whole potato that would otherwise be lost if you'd had to just dispose of them.

Thank you for the response, I see this section a lot more clearly now!

 

Initially it confused me probably because I never dealt with this before. I spoke to my team and we are going to implement a new code and great explanation of recoup :)

 

I am still unsure if changing packaging (ex. boxes) are also considered rework? Even if the raw finished product goes untouched.


Edited by jperri, 07 August 2019 - 05:02 PM.


#4 The Food Scientist

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 07:58 PM

I would def give the new product a new code, because you have simply introduced other processing step into it, like in your example, peeled potatoes were later made into fries.


Edited by The Food Scientist, 07 August 2019 - 07:58 PM.

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#5 SQFconsultant

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 08:37 PM

You would normally reference the OLD code, but issue a new code.

 

A change to packaging would not be considered "rework", however infomation concerning the old packaging needs to be documented in the event there was an issue (chemical migration, etc.) with the old packaging so that you can trace back.


Warm regards,

 

 

Glenn Oster

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#6 jperri

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:11 AM

Thank you all for the response, much appreciated!

 

They are very helpful!






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