Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

How to keep humidity levels low after wash down procedures?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 kevinkt

kevinkt

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 40 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 18 October 2019 - 01:28 AM

I would like to know what steps others take to keep humidity levels low after wash down procedures of our filling machines. Do you guys run a  dehumidifier all night? Run the HVAC on all night? Nothing ? Run fans? 

I would like to see how others tackle this. 

 

thanks  


Edited by kevinkt, 18 October 2019 - 01:31 AM.


#2 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 2,697 posts
  • 692 thanks
184
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 18 October 2019 - 02:00 PM

Rather than focus on removing it, is it possible to minimise it?  Can you use less water or use wash machines for parts to minimse the water getting into the air?



#3 Ryan M.

Ryan M.

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,203 posts
  • 439 thanks
238
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, AL
  • Interests:Reading, crosswords, passionate discussions, laughing at US politics.

Posted 18 October 2019 - 06:23 PM

What GMO said, but you'll likely need other mitigation steps.  I've found that reducing the temperature during wash (if you use CIP this should be relatively easy).  Most people think higher temperature is always better, but that really isn't the case.  In some cases higher temperature hurts your cleaning effectiveness, and many cases you just waste the energy to get it that hot without helping the cleaning efficiency.

 

So...do what you can to reduce water and temperature.  As for dehumidifying if your ventilation isn't set up well, and the filtering ability you may be best off using a dehumidifier in the area to knock the down humidity.  If your capital budget, or if you can get buy in, see if the ventilation system can be upgraded in that area.  It could be something as small or simple as a larger blower motor for the HVAC.  Just keep in mind you don't want it recontaminating your cleaned surfaces so filtration is key.



Thanked by 2 Members:
Charles.C , kevinkt

#4 kevinkt

kevinkt

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 40 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 18 October 2019 - 06:36 PM

What GMO said, but you'll likely need other mitigation steps.  I've found that reducing the temperature during wash (if you use CIP this should be relatively easy).  Most people think higher temperature is always better, but that really isn't the case.  In some cases higher temperature hurts your cleaning effectiveness, and many cases you just waste the energy to get it that hot without helping the cleaning efficiency.

 

So...do what you can to reduce water and temperature.  As for dehumidifying if your ventilation isn't set up well, and the filtering ability you may be best off using a dehumidifier in the area to knock the down humidity.  If your capital budget, or if you can get buy in, see if the ventilation system can be upgraded in that area.  It could be something as small or simple as a larger blower motor for the HVAC.  Just keep in mind you don't want it recontaminating your cleaned surfaces so filtration is key.

Thank you, I will see what we can do about lowering the temp of the water for our CIP system. 



#5 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 2,697 posts
  • 692 thanks
184
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 20 October 2019 - 07:05 PM

Thank you, I will see what we can do about lowering the temp of the water for our CIP system. 

 

The above advice to reduce CIP temperature is good for some contaminants and good for some cleaning and disinfection agents but not others.  It might be helpful if you give us more details? 

 

Also CIP should not be resulting in high atmospheric humidity unless you have a lot of leaks, in which case, the solution is surely fix the leaks?  Perhaps you can tell us more?



#6 Ryan M.

Ryan M.

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,203 posts
  • 439 thanks
238
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, AL
  • Interests:Reading, crosswords, passionate discussions, laughing at US politics.

Posted 21 October 2019 - 08:29 PM

The above advice to reduce CIP temperature is good for some contaminants and good for some cleaning and disinfection agents but not others.  It might be helpful if you give us more details? 

 

Also CIP should not be resulting in high atmospheric humidity unless you have a lot of leaks, in which case, the solution is surely fix the leaks?  Perhaps you can tell us more?

 

Both true.  I think it is best the OP consult their chemical supplier for their expertise.  They should be able to help them.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users