Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

SQF 11.6.5 - Contract example for trucking companies


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 danh@nutmegspice

danh@nutmegspice

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 17 posts
  • 3 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:06 PM

Good morning,

 

I am currently trying to implement 11.6.5 and having some issues. First off is the guy in charge of purchasing at my company, he's built relationships with some of these companies and doesn't see the issue with transport issues. Basically to him, if the box is damaged, throw it out and use whats good. I'm working on that but i need some help crafting a contract for our trucking companies to sign off on guaranteeing better transportation practices.

 

Does anybody have an example i could use of what you require your trucking companies to sign off on?

 

Thanks,



#2 jperri

jperri

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 85 posts
  • 23 thanks
10
Good

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Female

Posted 02 January 2020 - 02:25 PM

Hello,

 

I have encountered a similar situation! Our logistics guy was skeptical about the need for contracts since we supply low risk products, but SQF requirements prevailed and I was able to send and receive signed contracts.

 

The following standards are listed on the contract and required by all of our third-party transporters. We ship out raw produce, but of course your requirements may vary depending on your product and identified risks.

 

1.Carrier Inspection

  • The vehicle should be clean and free from contaminants that would render it unsuitable for the transportation of food (ex. free of pests and vermin).
  • The vehicle is dry, well maintained, walls, ceilings are in good conditions, no holes or cracks.

2. Loading

  • Handling of packed pallets or boxes during loading must be such that the packaging material and its protective coverings are not damaged.
  • Produce is loaded on clean pallets inside the trailer. No product is stored directly on the floor. Products shall be stacked correctly to prevent them from falling over.
  • Products must not be stored or transported in conjunction with any product or chemical that could cause damage to or contaminate the food.
  • The transport company must ensure that vehicles such as bulk tankers are of hygienic design and designated for food use, and procedures must be in place to prevent cross contamination from previous loads.

3. In Transit

  • All outward-bound vehicles are locked directly after loading; before leaving the facility, while awaiting loading and while unattended. If broken seal/lock is discovered, communicate to office.
  • Where product temperature control is required, documented procedures shall be in place to ensure that required temperatures are met. Fresh/chilled loads (38F/4C) and dry load (ambient).
  • Documented maintenance and hygiene procedures shall be maintained for all vehicles. Records to be available upon request.

4. Arrival Inspection

  • If the load arrives damaged, received in an unsatisfactory condition, or not transported in accordance with this Code of Practice, COMPANY has the right to reject the load.

 

Signed and dated by company and ourselves. This was accepted by the SQF Auditor.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Jenna



Thanked by 2 Members:

#3 FurFarmandFork

FurFarmandFork

    Food Safety Consultant, Production Supervisor

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,264 posts
  • 576 thanks
170
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon, USA

Posted 02 January 2020 - 07:49 PM

Unfortunately unless you arrange ALL of your own freight, you won't always get to hold trucking companies accountable. Better to focus on the supplier relationship and maek sure the supplier pays for the damage.

 

As far as your purchasing department goes, destroy/demand credit for damaged items and receive the rest isn't a crazy policy, and can be completely within the requirements of 11.6.5.

 

11.6.5 Loading, Transport and Unloading Practices
11.6.5.1 The practices applied during loading, transport and unloading of food shall be documented, implemented
and designed to maintain appropriate storage conditions and product integrity. Foods shall be loaded, transported
and unloaded under conditions suitable to prevent cross-contamination.
 

 

 

If your policy says that you will destroy any materials in which the primary packaging has been damaged/compromised, then you have mde sure that the product integrity is appropriate and protected. Demanding perfect freight every time is a standard no company will agree to as i'ts unrealistic. Continuous improvement and review is of course appropriate.

Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

#4 danh@nutmegspice

danh@nutmegspice

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 17 posts
  • 3 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 03 January 2020 - 04:19 PM

Thanks to both of you guys. Furfarmandfork, understandable approach and most likely the way i am going to go. To clarify, we have had instances in the past with product that packaging that has been compromised and production was still told to use it. Trying to keep it as strict as possible so a situation like that doesn't arise again.



#5 FurFarmandFork

FurFarmandFork

    Food Safety Consultant, Production Supervisor

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,264 posts
  • 576 thanks
170
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon, USA

Posted 06 January 2020 - 06:53 PM

Thanks to both of you guys. Furfarmandfork, understandable approach and most likely the way i am going to go. To clarify, we have had instances in the past with product that packaging that has been compromised and production was still told to use it. Trying to keep it as strict as possible so a situation like that doesn't arise again.

 

That's the key to your sanity, focus on prevention and let the "this time" stuff that's sketch go ahead and go by. It's a long game. 

 

Getting managemetn buy in on that is really about getting the money back, which is why supplier relationships are good to make sure that when that stuff arrives, it becomes free to throw away (outside of other soft costs like production time lost).


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate