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FFVA - Food Fraud Vulnerability Assessment

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#1 rpsjo

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 04:44 PM

Hi everyone,

 

We have an audit coming up mid September. I'm hung up on 1.08.01, "is there a written food fraud vulnerability assessment (FFVA) and protection plan for all types of fraud including all incoming and outgoing products. 

 

I am not sure how to do this and was wondering if you guys could share with me your FFVA to give me an idea of how to set it up and what to actually look at to include on it. Also, what does it mean by a protection plan for all types of fraud? What is considered fraud? 

 

I appreciate your help! I am new to this. We are a small potato handler business. 



#2 olenazh

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 05:06 PM

Please, see attached, hope would give an idea. Good luck with yours!

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#3 SQFconsultant

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 06:01 PM

Before you go down the path on this -   is this a raw whole potato operation where you harvest, (or take from a harvester) and pack - easy peasy like that?


Kind regards,

 

Glenn Oster
 
 
GOC GROUP / +1.800.793.7042 / Food - Food Packaging - Food Storage/DC

SQF, BRC & IFS System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants

Serving Small-to-Mid-Size Businesses | We are International - Accepting all major C-Currencies

Internal Auditor Training | eConsultant | SQF, BRC & IFS Pre-Development or Pre-Audit GAP

http://www.GlennOsterConsulting.com  -- 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#4 rpsjo

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 06:04 PM

We are a raw potato handler. We receive potatoes directly from fields in 10-wheelers and then run them through a line that removes dirt and debris and sizes them. From there the potatoes are stored in our coolers and shipped via semi's to our customer who then processes them. 



#5 SQFconsultant

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 06:13 PM

We are a raw potato handler. We receive potatoes directly from fields in 10-wheelers and then run them through a line that removes dirt and debris and sizes them. From there the potatoes are stored in our coolers and shipped via semi's to our customer who then processes them. 

 

Check with your CB or Primus directly and see if they allow exemptions - a potato is a potato is a potato - been in many potato growers and packers and still don't see a way for food fraud.  There is of course the remote possibility of pumping liquid in, but I've never even seen a report on that.


Edited by SQFconsultant, 19 August 2020 - 06:14 PM.

Kind regards,

 

Glenn Oster
 
 
GOC GROUP / +1.800.793.7042 / Food - Food Packaging - Food Storage/DC

SQF, BRC & IFS System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants

Serving Small-to-Mid-Size Businesses | We are International - Accepting all major C-Currencies

Internal Auditor Training | eConsultant | SQF, BRC & IFS Pre-Development or Pre-Audit GAP

http://www.GlennOsterConsulting.com  -- 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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#6 rpsjo

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 06:19 PM

Exactly! Unfortunately last year's auditor down scored us in this category. I appreciate your feedback. 



#7 olenazh

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 06:25 PM

Just make it formal, but address all comments from the auditor



#8 redfox

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Posted 20 August 2020 - 08:04 AM

Hello rpsjo,

 

Vulnerability assessment is only done on the in-coming raw materials and ingredients.

 

 

regards,

redfox



#9 Karenconstable

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 10:15 AM

Hi rpsjo and Glenn, 

 

Don't forget that food fraud is more than economically-motivated adulteration (eg. adding water).  A potato is a potato, but a conventionally grown potato is cheaper than an organic potato.  A Mexican-grown sebago isn't a locally grown sebago.   A pesticide-free heirloom variety isn't the same as a conventional, pesticide-treated potato.  

 

Food fraud includes more than just adulteration, and potatoes can be affected. Misrepresentation of geographical origin, organic status and variety are types of fraud that affect vegetables like potatoes. 

 

For example, an investigation in 2018 found that potatoes in Ireland had been fraudulently claimed to be the Queens variety, when they were in fact Accords. (http://www.highlandr...abelling-in-nw/)

 

In India in 2017, potato traders were accused of covering low quality potatoes with brick dust to sell a poor quality product at a premium price to make quick money http://www.millenniu...potatoes-257456

 

If I was a potato packer I would want to show my auditor that I had considered the possibility that my suppliers might be providing potatoes that aren't quite true to label.  This would be especially important if I was selling 'organic' or 'local' produce. 

 

I hope this helps. 

Karen



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#10 olenazh

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 02:16 PM

Hi rpsjo and Glenn, 

 

Don't forget that food fraud is more than economically-motivated adulteration (eg. adding water).  A potato is a potato, but a conventionally grown potato is cheaper than an organic potato.  A Mexican-grown sebago isn't a locally grown sebago.   A pesticide-free heirloom variety isn't the same as a conventional, pesticide-treated potato.  

 

Food fraud includes more than just adulteration, and potatoes can be affected. Misrepresentation of geographical origin, organic status and variety are types of fraud that affect vegetables like potatoes. 

 

For example, an investigation in 2018 found that potatoes in Ireland had been fraudulently claimed to be the Queens variety, when they were in fact Accords. (http://www.highlandr...abelling-in-nw/)

 

In India in 2017, potato traders were accused of covering low quality potatoes with brick dust to sell a poor quality product at a premium price to make quick money http://www.millenniu...potatoes-257456

 

If I was a potato packer I would want to show my auditor that I had considered the possibility that my suppliers might be providing potatoes that aren't quite true to label.  This would be especially important if I was selling 'organic' or 'local' produce. 

 

I hope this helps. 

Karen

Excellent observation, bravo! 







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