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Is it feasible to achieve a <10F product temp in a freezer that is set at -10F?


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pghosh

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 04:18 PM

One of our customers require the frozen product temp to be at 10F or below upon receipt.

We conducted a study in house to monitor the product temp inside the freezer for a week by placing data loggers in the product. The product temperature was recorded at 15.7F while the freezer ambient temperature was recorded at -7F.

Would like to hear your thoughts on if it is feasible to achieve a <10F product temp in a freezer that’s set at -10F?

Thanks.

Piki



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Posted 29 September 2021 - 04:27 PM

What was the product temp at when it when into the freezer

what kind of product is it

is this a blast freezer or a storage unit

is the product on pallets?

 

It is going to take a long time to reduce your product to 10F in a -7 freezer........like weeks if not months, 

 

If you can answer a few or all of above, be able to offer more help


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pghosh

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 04:34 PM

These are topped pizzas. It’s not a blast freezer and the product is packed in master cases and stored on a pallet.
The approximate temperature of the product entering the freezer is at 20F.

What do we need to do to bring the temp down faster? We are open to suggestions.



Scampi

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 04:40 PM

Most pizza factories i know of are using a blast freezer for precisely this reason

 

Once they are packaged and then put into cardboard cartons, the laws of thermodynamics require for first the item to force the "heat" out from the middle, and then the cold can infiltrate from the outside in  (much like a roast of beef but in reverse)

 

The need to be at or below 10F BEFORE going into the storage units, and that will happen even faster if you do that prior to packaging

 

If you have the floor space, you can add a length of blast freezer to the conveyor system (not cheap)

 

OR you can put them on some sort of open air raking (covered) into the freezer you have, until they are at 10F, then package and palletize.

 

something like this  http://www.fpscorp.ca/iqf-freezers


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Charles.C

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Posted 29 September 2021 - 04:41 PM

One of our customers require the frozen product temp to be at 10F or below upon receipt.

We conducted a study in house to monitor the product temp inside the freezer for a week by placing data loggers in the product. The product temperature was recorded at 15.7F while the freezer ambient temperature was recorded at -7F.

Would like to hear your thoughts on if it is feasible to achieve a <10F product temp in a freezer that’s set at -10F?

Thanks.

Piki

Hi pghosh,

 

Sounds like you are attempting to use a cold storage to deep freeze yr product (one of the original methods for producing frozen foods which typically involved overnight (+) freezing.

 

In principle it will work, "eventually".

 

Now you know why people buy freezers.


Edited by Charles.C, 30 September 2021 - 03:33 AM.
added

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Jim E.

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Posted Yesterday, 09:49 PM

Also, too add the fact you are packing and stacking the product to freeze will lengthen the time required to freeze the inner product.  Freeze before you pack is the best way to go for sure.






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