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BRCGS Packaging Materials clause 3.4.1 - specifications

specifications 3.4.1 packaging

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adeletheqa

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 12:27 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I'm fairly new at my job and i'm trying to match up each clause with the appropriate information on the system. I'm having trouble understanding clause 3.4.1. about specifications. Or rather, having trouble finding how the company has covered this clause in the past. Does it mean that for every raw material purchased by the company, I need a product specification from the supplier of the raw material? Or is it more specific to the products we are selling, in relation to size, artwork, etc? I hope I'm making myself clear enough for someone to help me to understand.

Thanks for your time.



beautiophile

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 01:10 AM

SOI of 3.4.1: 

 

Appropriate specifications shall exist for raw materials, intermediate and finished products, and for any product or service which could affect the safety, quality or legality of the finished product and customer requirements.

The bold text mostly answers you questions.

The red text reminds that the specs are needed not only for tangible matter but also for supporting tasks; for example packing specification, transportation condition (stacking cartons, pest-control, co-shipping with chemicals, etc.), quality control testing, product analysis (migration test, heavy metal limits).

P/S: Welcome to forum.  :welcome:


Edited by beautiophile, 13 January 2022 - 01:19 AM.


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adeletheqa

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 01:47 AM

Thank your reply beautiophile. And thankyou for the Welcome :)

That makes sense. I guess now I'm just unsure how in the previous audits, we were able to prove that we had done this. I can find SAQ's where it states the raw material which is supplied. Is this considered the specification? Is it as simple as stating the name of the plastic that they are supplying to us? If it is, then I now understand how we have been able to meet the requirement of the clause.



adeletheqa

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 02:05 AM

Actually, I think the technical data sheets might pass as specifications? I had this thought earlier and googled it but google said TDS and Specs were not the same. But on my TDS's it does say at the bottom "Changes in specification can differ, subject to changes in resins/suppliers" so does that mean this is suitable? Please forgive me for asking what may be very stupid questions.



beautiophile

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 03:58 AM

I guess now I'm just unsure how in the previous audits, we were able to prove that we had done this. I can find SAQ's where it states the raw material which is supplied. Is this considered the specification? 

This means it's easy to retrieve the true full specification from your archive or you supplier. An auditor is always on a errand so that he might pass quick seeing that.

 

 

 I think the technical data sheets might pass as specifications? 

You are right.

 

 

but google said TDS and Specs were not the same

Google was also right.

Because a TDS can include the specification AND the performance of product. A product specification only describes, welp, specifically the product itself. A TDS might add how it can be used elsewhere (moulding or thin-film inflation of plastic resins). If its specs change, its usage changes. Other said: "Changes in specification can differ, subject to changes in resin/suppliers" 



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adeletheqa

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 04:58 AM

Thank you so much, this has cleared everything up for me. I really appreciate it!!



Charles.C

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 08:26 AM

Thank you so much, this has cleared everything up for me. I really appreciate it!!

Hi adele,

 

You might consider asking yourself an elementary question -  How can you evaluate yr incoming materials, etc in the absence of a (purchasing etc) specification ?

 

IM(Food)EX the routine requirement has an additional step - it is fundamentally necessary that the specification is documented as agreed between the relevant parties., ie no signature = no business.

 

This topic is operationally allied to the equally important concept of "Approved Suppliers".


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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MlissaB

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 04:39 PM

We purchase many of our materials (paper, glue, ink) based on supplier spec so we do not have our own specification for those items. We have spelled this out in our purchasing procedures so during audits we can point to that and refer to the supplier spec instead of managing our own. 



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Charles.C

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Posted 13 January 2022 - 05:01 PM

We purchase many of our materials (paper, glue, ink) based on supplier spec so we do not have our own specification for those items. We have spelled this out in our purchasing procedures so during audits we can point to that and refer to the supplier spec instead of managing our own. 

Hi Mlissa,

 

Thks for the input.

 

IMEX auditors may reject this approach since they require to see your formal specifications under your own name. Not surprising really from a documentary POV although I concur that it likely involves mostly duplication/cross-referencing.

 

What do you do if your customer's requirements are not aligned to your supplier's specifications ?


Edited by Charles.C, 13 January 2022 - 06:58 PM.
added

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


beautiophile

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Posted 14 January 2022 - 07:30 AM

 

What do you do if your customer's requirements are not aligned to your supplier's specifications ?

Hi Charles,

IM(non-food)EX, this sounds like a control freak.

A (crude) material manufacturers may have catalogues of their available products with detailed TDSs, incl. specs ofc, and show a potential customer while implying "Are you buying one of these or not?". A signed purchase contract means both have already approved the specs.







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