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Product ReWork for Plastic Films

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RDM_Rep

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Posted 09 February 2022 - 04:55 PM

Good Morning,

 

I am looking for clarification on product rework. I work for a packaging company; we convert master rolls of paper and sheeting to sheets or smaller rolls; etc, no actual organic matter or packaging of food on site. 

 

Sometimes, we only need a piece of that master roll to fulfill an order, and the master roll will go back into storage until the next time it makes sense to use it to fulfill another order. Would this be considered rework? 



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Posted 09 February 2022 - 05:06 PM

No, I don't think so as you do not make any changes to the roll



Brendan Triplett

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Posted 09 February 2022 - 05:35 PM

Hey RDM,

 

I would tend to disagree, especially if you are charging for the service.  Any time that a product is altered or additional materials are added to make the product conform to the specifications then it should be considered rework.  If you sent the roll without the small piece then it would be nonconforming and rejected.  So you need to rework it to make it complete.

 

Is it rework? My vote is for yes.

 

Cheers!


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FSQA

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Posted 09 February 2022 - 07:30 PM

IMO: this should not be considered a Rework, since no changes are made to the ingredients or specs of the product (other than size).

 

This should be treated as similar to when you have a partial case or product, that can be used for future production needs.

 

As long as traceability is controlled for how much was used in either orders (previous and next one) this should be fine.



Brendan Triplett

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Posted 09 February 2022 - 10:45 PM

I guess it comes down to who the work is being done for.  If the final product is going to the client then it would not be rework because they don't care about the work that went into it only that it meets the specifications that you set.  From a six sigma perspective it would be rework but that might be a bit of a deep dive.  However, If the client is asking you to change the initial specifications of the master roll so that it meets their new specifications then it would be rework.  All in context I guess.

 

Who is asking you to make the changes and who is your end client?

 

Cheers!


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beautiophile

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Posted 10 February 2022 - 02:05 AM

Good Morning,

 

I am looking for clarification on product rework. I work for a packaging company; we convert master rolls of paper and sheeting to sheets or smaller rolls; etc, no actual organic matter or packaging of food on site. 

 

Sometimes, we only need a piece of that master roll to fulfill an order, and the master roll will go back into storage until the next time it makes sense to use it to fulfill another order. Would this be considered rework? 

 

No, that's just discrete usage of stocked materials.



Brendan Triplett

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Posted 10 February 2022 - 10:26 AM

Discrete manufacturing... now you are talking about process theory.  The end unit can not be disassembled or differentiated into its separate parts so it cant be discrete manufacturing.  Unless I am wrong here about your end product RDM.  It would be Process Manufacturing and then end up being rework under the following circumstances:

  • material cannot be broken down into its initial parts
  • material is not done the same way every time so it is not part of a regular process
  • material is not standardized
  • the client has specifically asked for the size or scope of the material to be outside of what is normally created

If, however, the client has not asked you to make the roll in this size and you are simply making the roll in the size it is supposed to be but your machine or process made it smaller for some reason then it would not be rework and would pretty much just be the cost of dong business.

 

I see it in the way of cases of product.  Here is an example.  I sell a case of 50 of widgets.  If the customer wants me to make them a special case of 60 widgets then I have to "rework" the cases and make them a special case.  I can usually do this with a price markup for the trouble.  If, however, while making my standard cases of 50 widgets I find that there is a case with 40 and I need to add 10 from surplus then it is not "rework" because I am taking from other materials to make the standard size product.


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Scotty_SQF

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Posted 10 February 2022 - 06:56 PM

IMO: I would say no it is not rework, rather the item goes Back to Inventory (BTI).  As long as it's tagged, labeled and traceable, you will be good. 



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Posted 11 February 2022 - 05:33 AM

...

 

I see it in the way of cases of product.  Here is an example.  I sell a case of 50 of widgets.  If the customer wants me to make them a special case of 60 widgets then I have to "rework" the cases and make them a special case.  I can usually do this with a price markup for the trouble.  If, however, while making my standard cases of 50 widgets I find that there is a case with 40 and I need to add 10 from surplus then it is not "rework" because I am taking from other materials to make the standard size product.

Your example doesn't fit the OP. 

 

 

If the customer wants me to make them a special case of 60 widgets then I have to "rework" the cases and make them a special case

This means a different product with different specifications. The "rework" here sounds like re-designing.

 

If, however, while making my standard cases of 50 widgets I find that there is a case with 40 and I need to add 10 from surplus then it is not "rework" because I am taking from other materials to make the standard size product.

It is a rework because you fix the out-of-specification 40-widget case so that it becomes the right 50-widget one. The 10 widgets are supposed to be in the planned material amount. If they are surplus, it means you have made a poor calculation.


Edited by beautiophile, 11 February 2022 - 05:34 AM.


Brendan Triplett

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Posted 11 February 2022 - 09:49 AM

You are missing what I am saying in all of that beautiophile.  The OP is saying that additional materials are being added.  I am saying that if the roll he is making is not the correct size and materials are being added then it is rework (but only in the sense of selling the service), UNLESS it is being sold as a standard size.  If the customer is buying it as a certain size then it is not rework.  

 

Rework, in its definition is when you have a defect that needs to be fixed.  If we are going strictly by the OP then none of this is rework because there are no defective parts that need to be disassembled, replaced, and then reassembled.

 

I am thinking more along the lines of contract work and how services would be sold.  The calculation of widgets can off due to mechanical error or any number of issues.  Try not to get bogged down too much in the example.  Process theory can be a pain.


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Ian Nairn

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Posted 14 February 2022 - 08:44 AM

Good Morning, I am Quality Manager at a packaging company and IMO, if you are removing part of a master reel to fulfil a customer order the this is not deemed rework, a rework in packaging would be for instance a delivery arrives at customer who advises you

some of the cores have been crushed and you need to bring this back to make good, what you are described as the scenario is your general manufacturing process.





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