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How do you measure the temperature at dispatch of transport vehicles?

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AJL

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 12:03 PM

Ok, how do people measure the temperature at dispatch of their transport vehicles?
The infra red thermometers are useless,
And apparently Auditors won't accept the readings shown on the trucks?
Looking forward to getting some good advice :)



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Posted 21 February 2022 - 12:32 PM

We leverage a program that measures temperature throughout the day and reports to us.  The system is calibrated annually and has been accepted for cold chain conformance.

 

Samsara

 

Hope it helps. 

 

Cheers!


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AJL

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 12:57 PM

Hi, thanks for the post, but isn't your product more aimed at the transport companies?
We need a simple measurement of the temperature of the truck?
How does this work in a practical sense?

How do we take a one time measurement of how cold a truck is?



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Posted 21 February 2022 - 01:57 PM

A temperature controlled truck should have a temperature setting on the box itself, located near the cab.  You should have records of the last time that it has been calibrated.  Maintain those records in your files and then reference the truck temp from the screen.  Make sure that you are referencing the "actual truck temperature" and not the truck "set temperature."


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Brendan Triplett

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 01:59 PM

Of course, some of this depends on whether or not you own your fleet.  It is easier to control records if you do.

 

Cheers!


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AJL

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 02:47 PM

Thanks Brendan, we don't have our own fleet, it is third party.
Do you think I can justify it to an auditor, using this temperature, if the truck company is GFSI certified ?
How can I see the difference between set temp and actual temp?
Thanks :)



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Posted 21 February 2022 - 03:18 PM

Actual Temp will be the large number in the center of the screen.  Set temp is usually up and to the right of the number, smaller.  You could get specifics by looking up the model number on the internet vs what you actually have in your lot.

 

I guess if the auditor is really giving you a hard time you could get a letter from the fleet owner stating that their fleet is calibrated for temperature annually.  Basically a letter guaranteeing that they are providing accurately calibrated transportation.

 

Cheers!


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AJL

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 06:53 PM

Thanks! Are there any other possibilities do you think for taking our own measurements.



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Posted 21 February 2022 - 07:12 PM

We have had no issues with our warehouse guys using infra-red thermometers.


-Setanta         

 

 

 


AJL

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 07:46 PM

Thanks Setanta, is it refrigerated or frozen? :)



Setanta

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Posted 21 February 2022 - 08:18 PM


Thanks Setanta, is it refrigerated or frozen? :)


Both.

Edited by Setanta, 21 February 2022 - 08:18 PM.

-Setanta         

 

 

 


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Posted 22 February 2022 - 10:02 AM

I have a customer that uses and infrared gun.  They open a box on the truck and temp that, then they use that measurement for box temperature and for product confirmation.  It is frozen and refrigerated.  Interesting technique.

 

Cheers!


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Posted 22 February 2022 - 10:11 AM

Thanks Brendan, all fine right, but what if the truck arrives empty, and there is no product to read the temperature of?



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Posted 22 February 2022 - 10:19 AM

I have seen most people use a infrared gun and just scan the reefer unit or the back wall to confirm temp.  If they won't accept that then you will be left with reading the unit, which I see a lot with companies that do a lot of shipping.  There are large companies in my area that check people (empty trucks) in for their appointments and one of the first questions that they as is the truck actual temperature and truck set point temperature.  They have the driver adjust to what they want them to be at and then they maintain these records on file for the inspector.

 

Cheers!


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AJL

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Posted 22 February 2022 - 10:45 AM

Brendan thank you! You have been so helpful. 

So maybe you could help with this as well. 

Our trucking company has said somthing along these lines

Hey, if we show up with an empty, pre cooled truck -18 or lower, when you add your product in to the truck, it won't cause the cooling cycle to kick in. 

It is actually better for your product, if we show up with an ambient or cool truck, because in that way, the cooling system will kick in, it is better for your product. 

Thoughts? Is there some truth in the matter? Having studied engineering, and understanding that it takes a lot of time and energy to heat up a few pallets of frozen product, they could be right? But how would I prove this theory to an auditor? 

Have you got any ideas? Once again, thanks for providing your valuable input here. 



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Posted 22 February 2022 - 11:00 AM

I really don't see how it would be better to start with a "warm" truck? 

 

If the temperature at departure is already matching the product temperature it means you will have less fluctuation and that is better for the product, the "cooling cycle" starts when you turn it on, the condenser part starts when the air temperature exceeds the defined limit. And by starting with a warm truck the first hour or so it will be more difficult to maintain the standard temperature as the walls need to cool down to and will use "cold calories" which should have been used to maintain the air/product temperature.

 

I have never heard of loading warm trucks for chilled products. 



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Posted 22 February 2022 - 11:15 AM

Pre-cooling the truck is the standard.  If you are loading temperature sensitive product onto a truck that has been sitting in the sun for 12 hours then you will have a major change in temperature that will thaw the outer layers of your product while the temperature drops to the reefer set point.  Your best bet is to place the reefer unit on "cycle sentry" and pre cool the truck.  Cycle entry cools the truck and then shuts off once it reaches the best temperature.  If you run the reefer unit with cycle sentry "off" then you are essentially running the unit continuously, which is probably what the trucking company does not want to do.  Any company that I work with for pickups requires the truck to be precooled so that they can ensure that the product is being transported at a temperature that maintains the product "cold chain".  Showing up with the reefer off is just the trucking company trying to save engine hours on their units for maintenance.

 

Cheers!


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