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Are paper sacks with inner liner (or with inner liner removed) OK for powders?

packaging paper sack powder storage removable liner

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matthewcc

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Posted 05 May 2022 - 10:30 PM

Hello all,

 

We want to come up with a more space-efficient storage method for powders that will be used in dietary supplements.  Are paper sacks with a removable inner liner (I believe it's called a "dairy block bag") acceptable for storing powders?  For general storage, we would store the powder in the sack using the plastic liner.  However, if we need to send powders to heat-treatment, we would remove the inner plastic liner (because the plastic liner would melt somewhat, which is a risk to the powder) and send the powder to treatment in the paper sack, e.g., stitched shut. 

 

We are evaluating the plastic sack with removable inner liner as a proposal put forth from our purchasing.

 

We manufacture dietary supplements in the United States under 21 CFR Part 111 and are SQF Edition 9 certified.

 

Thank you,

Matthew



Brothbro

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Posted 06 May 2022 - 05:52 PM

Hi Matthew,

 

I would make sure that the inner liner is FDA compliant for food-contact. ULINE makes heavy duty bags in a variety of sizes that work well for powders/capsules:

 

https://www.uline.co...ds=xyzulinebags

 

What I wonder is: if you're using a compliant bag as a liner why even have the paper bag at all? Just use the plastic bag straight up. I would consider paper bags a risk because they would absorb moisture and be more prone to damage compared to a durable plastic. If you send product for sterilization, perhaps you could put the product into a food-grade retort-tolerant bag then. I would be wary of putting paper bags through a heat treatment too, which I'm assuming requires some steam. This would likely damage the bag right?

 

Could not find any examples online about a "dairy block bag", I'm not familiar with the term! Outside of FDA compliant materials, a powder bag needs to be moisture resistant to protect the quality of the powder. Clear bags would be acceptable if you're not concerned about light damaging your product. Otherwise, store them in a dark place or an opaque secondary container.


Edited by Brothbro, 06 May 2022 - 05:59 PM.


matthewcc

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Posted 09 May 2022 - 10:43 PM

Hi Matthew,

 

I would make sure that the inner liner is FDA compliant for food-contact. ULINE makes heavy duty bags in a variety of sizes that work well for powders/capsules:

 

https://www.uline.co...ds=xyzulinebags

 

What I wonder is: if you're using a compliant bag as a liner why even have the paper bag at all? Just use the plastic bag straight up. I would consider paper bags a risk because they would absorb moisture and be more prone to damage compared to a durable plastic. If you send product for sterilization, perhaps you could put the product into a food-grade retort-tolerant bag then. I would be wary of putting paper bags through a heat treatment too, which I'm assuming requires some steam. This would likely damage the bag right?

 

Could not find any examples online about a "dairy block bag", I'm not familiar with the term! Outside of FDA compliant materials, a powder bag needs to be moisture resistant to protect the quality of the powder. Clear bags would be acceptable if you're not concerned about light damaging your product. Otherwise, store them in a dark place or an opaque secondary container.

 

I learned more about the proposal, and the reason for the paper/plastic combo is to make it more recyclable.  We would place the paper bag inside of a fiber drum to protect the paper bag from moisture and damage.



Evans X.

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Posted 11 May 2022 - 08:19 AM

Greetings Mathew,

 

In terms of recycling I think you are "polluting" more with the double bags and the combo. Why not use one food-grade recyclable plastic. There are also heat-resistant recyclable plastics and even if you are unsure you can always test it for migration in a lab.

I too don't know what a dairy block bag is. Could it be the squared plastic bag that you vacuum cheeses (in blocks?) in them??

As Brothbro mentioned the paper bag is susceptible to damage even if you protect it with fiber(?).

 

Regards!







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